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Record Details

Record 27 of 653
Convection and Easterly Waves Observed in the Eastern Pacific ITCZ During EPIC2001
Author and Affiliation:
Petersen, Walter A.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL United States)
Cifelli, Robert(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL United States)
Boccippio, Dennis J.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL United States)
Rutledge, Steven A.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL United States)
Arnold, James E. [Technical Monitor]
Abstract: During the last three weeks of September 2001, the East Pacific Investigation of Climate Processes in the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System (EPIC2001) intensive field campaign focused on studies of deep convection in the ITCZ-cold tongue complex over the Mexican warm-pool region (10 deg. N 95 deg. W) of the eastern Pacific Ocean. Major observational platforms deployed during this phase of EPIC2001 included two ships, the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown and the NSF R/V Horizon, and two research aircraft including a NOAA P-3 and the NCAR C-130. This study utilizes new C-band Doppler radar and sounding observations collected aboard the R/V Ronald Brown to describe the 4-D structure of ITCZ convection as a function of the environmental forcing and phase of 3-5 day easterly wave passages. Three distinct easterly wave passages occurred during EPIC2001. Each wave originated in the eastern Atlantic Ocean and after moving over Central America and into the eastern Pacific, were easily identified in time-height profiles of wind and thermodynamic data collected at the position of the R/V Brown. In all cases, the wave trough axes (as defined by changes in the meridional and zonal wind direction and changes in pressure altitude) exhibited relatively weak shear at low to mid-levels and tilted westward with height. The humidity profile in each wave did not exhibit as great a tilt in the vertical as the trough axes. Consistent with previous studies of westward tilting waves over the western Pacific Ocean, peaks in radar diagnosed rainfall tended to lead the passage of the surface wave trough by 0-2 days.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2002
Document ID:
20020050798
(Acquired Jun 28, 2002)
Subject Category: METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: American Meteorological Society 25th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology; 29 Apr. - 3 May 2002; San Diego, CA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Meteorological Society; United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL United States
Organization Source: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL United States
Description: 2p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: AIR WATER INTERACTIONS; OCEAN SURFACE; PACIFIC OCEAN; SURFACE WAVES; WIND (METEOROLOGY); CLIMATE; CONVECTION; WIND PROFILES; HUMIDITY; ATLANTIC OCEAN; RAIN; MERIDIONAL FLOW
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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