NASA Logo, External Link
Facebook icon, External Link to NASA STI page on Facebook Twitter icon, External Link to NASA STI on Twitter YouTube icon, External Link to NASA STI Channel on YouTube RSS icon, External Link to New NASA STI RSS Feed AddThis share icon
 

Record Details

Record 78 of 37678
Vertical Mass, Momentum, Moisture, and Heat Fluxes in Hurricanes above 10 km during CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4
Author and Affiliation:
Pfister, Leonhard(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA United States)
Bui, Paul(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA United States)
Herman, Robert(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA United States)
Dean-Day, Jon(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA United States)
Hipskind, R. Stephen [Technical Monitor]
Abstract: The third and fourth NASA Convection and Moisture Experiments (CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4) during the Atlantic hurricane seasons of 1998 and 2001, respectively, have yielded comprehensive multi-aircraft datasets using, both remote and in-situ instrumentation. Among these are high-frequency in-situ measurements of vertical wind, horizontal wind, temperature, and water vapor, made from NASA's DC-8 aircraft in the upper portions of the hurricane (typically above 10 km). Wind and temperature measurements were made at 20 hz by the NASA/Ames Meteorological Measurement System, while water vapor was measured at 1 hz by the NASA/JPL Laser Hygrometer. Fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture at these levels are important, since modeling studies have shown that ice processes, which are dominant at temperatures below -40C (where the DC-8 flies) are important for hurricane intensification. Also, there are indications from satellite studies that latent heat release at DC-8 levels is significant, perhaps a third of those in the mid-troposphere. Preliminary results show that typical updrafts in the eyewall region are comparable to or higher than previous observations of tropical convection, with several instances of updraft magnitudes of 15 meters per second (the maximum observed was 21 meters per second). They also show significant supersaturations (10-20% or more) in the updrafts, which would enhance the latent heat release at the upper levels of the hurricane. This paper will examine the magnitude and distribution of small and mesoscale vertical fluxes of mass, momentum, moisture, and heat. The goal is to examine the role of these fluxes in the overall budgets of the respective quantities in the upper portions of the hurricane.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2002
Document ID:
20020064458
(Acquired Aug 16, 2002)
Subject Category: METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: Intergovernmental Hurricane Conference; 11-15 Mar. 2002; New Orleans, LA; United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA United States
Organization Source: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: DC 8 AIRCRAFT; HEAT FLUX; HURRICANES; METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS; MOMENTUM; WATER VAPOR; WIND (METEOROLOGY); VERTICAL AIR CURRENTS; HEAT TRANSFER; LATENT HEAT; HYGROMETERS; ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE
› Back to Top
Find Similar Records
NASA Logo, External Link
NASA Official: Gerald Steeman
Site Curator: STI Program
Last Modified: August 22, 2011
Contact Us