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Record Details

Record 11 of 170
Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics
Author and Affiliation:
vanderWoerd, Mark(Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL United States)
Ferree, Darren(Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL United States)
Spearing, Scott(Morgan Research Corp., Huntsville, AL United States)
Monaco, Lisa(Morgan Research Corp., Huntsville, AL United States)
Molho, Josh(Caliper Technologies Corp., Mountain View, CA United States)
Spaid, Michael(Caliper Technologies Corp., Mountain View, CA United States)
Brasseur, Mike(Caliper Technologies Corp., Mountain View, CA United States)
Curreri, Peter A. [Technical Monitor]
Abstract: We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2002
Document ID:
20030001587
(Acquired Jan 03, 2003)
Subject Category: NONMETALLIC MATERIALS
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: International Union for Crystallography (IUC); 8 Aug. 2002; Geneva; Switzerland
Meeting Sponsor: International Union of Crystallography; Chester, United Kingdom
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NCC8-66
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL United States
Universities Space Research Association; Huntsville, AL United States
Organization Source: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: CRYSTALLIZATION; DIFFUSION; DISPENSERS; PROTEIN CRYSTAL GROWTH; VAPORS; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; BUBBLES; CHIPS (ELECTRONICS); FEASIBILITY; RESEARCH FACILITIES; SPACE STATIONS; X RAY DIFFRACTION
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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