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Record Details

Record 38 of 6359
Issues and Concerns in Robotic Drilling
Author and Affiliation:
Glass, Brian(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Abstract: Exploration of the Martian subsurface will be essential in the search for life and water, given the desiccated and highly oxidized conditions on the surface. Discovery of these, at least in non-fossil form, is unlikely without drilling or other physical access to the subsurface. Hence subsurface access will be critical for both future in-situ science and Mars sample return. Drilling applications present many new challenges for diagnosis and control technology. Traditionally, diagnosis has concentrated on determining the internal state of a system, and detecting failures of system components. In the case of drilling applications, an additional challenge is to diagnose the interactions between the drill and its environment. This is necessary because particular observations of the drilling operation may be consistent with a number of possible problems, including faults in the equipment, but also changes in the material being drilled (for example, from rock to ice). The diagnosis of a particular observation may also depend on knowledge of geological formations previously encountered during drilling, and different remedial actions may be required for each diagnosis. Current 2009 Mars mission scenarios call for no more than 33 sols to be spent drilling. Yet they also call for a baseline of two 2m-deep holes in each of three target areas, for a total of six drilling operations. Using current levels of automation, it is estimated that 15-16 sols would be required to drill each hole. As a result of this, either the drilling part of the mission plan will need to be severely downscoped to no more than two holes total, or on-board automation and robotics must be increased in order to reduce the number of sols required per hole by removing ground control from the drilling control loop. This lecture will discuss salient issues and concerns of robotic drilling automation compares with other applications, and implementation constraints.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2003
Document ID:
20030112126
(Acquired Dec 17, 2003)
Subject Category: CYBERNETICS, ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND ROBOTICS
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: Online Course; 29 Sep.2003; Rio Tinto; Spain
Financial Sponsor: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Organization Source: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: DRILLING; ROBOTICS; MARS SURFACE; MARS EXPLORATION; AUTOMATIC CONTROL; MARS SAMPLE RETURN MISSIONS; GROUND BASED CONTROL; NASA SPACE PROGRAMS; FOSSILS; WATER
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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