NASA Logo, External Link
Facebook icon, External Link to NASA STI page on Facebook Twitter icon, External Link to NASA STI on Twitter YouTube icon, External Link to NASA STI Channel on YouTube RSS icon, External Link to New NASA STI RSS Feed AddThis share icon
 

Record Details

Record 1 of 8220
Achieving and Validating the 1-centimeter Orbit: JASON-1 Precision Orbit Determination Using GPS, SLR, DORIS and Altimeter data
Author and Affiliation:
Luthcke, Scott B.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Zelensky, Nikita P.(Raytheon Information Technology and Scientific Services, Geodynamics Group, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Rowlands, David D.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Lemoine, Frank G.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Williams, Teresa A.(Raytheon Information Technology and Scientific Services, Geodynamics Group, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Abstract: Jason-1, launched on December 7, 2001, is continuing the time series of centimeter level ocean topography observations as the follow-on to the highly successful TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) radar altimeter satellite. The precision orbit determination (POD) is a critical component to meeting the ocean topography goals of the mission. Jason-1 is no exception and has set a 1 cm radial orbit accuracy goal, which represents a factor of two improvement over what is currently being achieved for T/P. The challenge to precision orbit determination (POD) is both achieving the 1 cm radial orbit accuracy and evaluating and validating the performance of the 1 cm orbit. Fortunately, Jason-1 POD can rely on four independent tracking data types including near continuous tracking data from the dual frequency codeless BlackJack GPS receiver. In addition, to the enhanced GPS receiver, Jason-1 carries significantly improved SLR and DORIS tracking systems along with the altimeter itself. We demonstrate the 1 cm radial orbit accuracy goal has been achieved using GPS data alone in a reduced dynamic solution. It is also shown that adding SLR data to the GPS-based solutions improves the orbits even further. In order to assess the performance of these orbits it is necessary to process all of the available tracking data (GPS, SLR, DORIS and altimeter crossover differences) as either dependent or independent of the orbit solutions. It was also necessary to compute orbit solutions using various combinations of the four available tracking data in order to independently assess the orbit performance. Towards this end, we have greatly improved orbits determined solely from SLR+DORIS data by applying the reduced dynamic solution strategy. In addition, we have computed reduced dynamic orbits based on SLR, DORIS and crossover data that are a significant improvement over the SLR and DORIS based dynamic solutions. These solutions provide the best performing orbits for independent validation of the GPS-based reduced dynamic orbits.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2003
Document ID:
20040040122
(Acquired Mar 31, 2004)
Subject Category: SPACE COMMUNICATIONS, SPACECRAFT COMMUNICATIONS, COMMAND AND TRACKING
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: TOPEX JASON Science Working Team Meeting; 18-21 Nov. 2003; Arles; France
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: TIME SERIES ANALYSIS; OCEANS; TOPOGRAPHY; GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM; ORBIT DETERMINATION; POSEIDON SATELLITE; TOPEX; SATELLITE TRACKING; ACCURACY; ALTIMETERS; FREQUENCIES
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
› Back to Top
Find Similar Records
NASA Logo, External Link
NASA Official: Gerald Steeman
Site Curator: STI Program
Last Modified: August 23, 2011
Contact Us