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single wall carbon nanotube-based structural health sensing materialsSingle wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-based materials represent the future aerospace vehicle construction material of choice based primarily on predicted strength-to-weight advantages and inherent multifunctionality. The multifunctionality of SWCNTs arises from the ability of the nanotubes to be either metallic or semi-conducting based on their chirality. Furthermore, simply changing the environment around a SWCNT can change its conducting behavior. This phenomenon is being exploited to create sensors capable of measuring several parameters related to vehicle structural health (i.e. strain, pressure, temperature, etc.) The structural health monitor is constructed using conventional electron-beam lithographic and photolithographic techniques to place specific electrode patterns on a surface. SWCNTs are then deposited between the electrodes using a dielectrophoretic alignment technique. Prototypes have been constructed on both silicon and polyimide substrates, demonstrating that surface-mountable and multifunctional devices based on SWCNTs can be realized.
Document ID
20040040295
Document Type
Preprint (Draft being sent to journal)
Authors
Watkins, A. Neal
(NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA, United States)
Ingram, JoAnne L.
(Swales Aerospace United States)
Jordan, Jeffrey D.
(NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA, United States)
Wincheski, Russell A.
(NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA, United States)
Smits, Jan M.
(Lockheed Martin Corp. United States)
Williams, Phillip A.
(National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council United States)
Date Acquired
August 21, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2004
Subject Category
Composite Materials
Report/Patent Number
Paper 439
Meeting Information
2004 Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show(Boston, MA)
Funding Number(s)
OTHER: 23-762-55-LB
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Work of the US Gov. Public Use Permitted.
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