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Multi-Wavelength Observations of Asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom: Visible, Infrared, and Thermal Spectroscopy ResultsThe August 2003 apparition of asteroid 2100 Ra-Shalom brought together a collaboration of observers with the goal of obtaining rotationally resolved multiwavelength spectra at each of 5 facilities: infrared spectra at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (Clark and Shepard), radar images at Arecibo (Shepard and Clark), thermal infrared spectra at Palomar (Lim, McConnochie and Bell), visible spectra at McDonald Observatory (Vilas, Lederer and Jarvis), and visible lightcurves at Ondrojev Observatory (Pravec). The radar data was to be used to develop a high spatial resolution physical model to be used in conjunction with spectral data to investigate compositional and textural properties on the near surface of Ra Shalom as a function of rotation phase. This was the first coordinated multi-wavelength investigation of any Aten asteroid. There are many reasons to study near-Earth asteroid (NEA) 2100 Ra-Shalom: 1) It has a controversial classification (is it a C- or K-type object)? 2) There would be interesting dynamical ramifications if Ra-Shalom is a K-type because most K-types come from the Eos family and there are no known dynamical pathways from Eos to the Aten population. 3) The best available spectra obtained previously may indicate a heterogeneous surface (most asteroids appear to be fairly homogeneous). 4) Ra-Shalom thermal observations obtained previously indicated a lack of regolith, minimizing the worry of space weathering effects in the spectra. 5) Radar observations obtained previously hinted at interesting surface structures. 6) Ra-Shalom is one of the largest Aten objects. And 7) Ra-Shalom is on a short list of proposed NEAs for spacecraft encounters and possible sample returns. Preliminary results from the visible, infrared, and thermal spectroscopy measurements will be presented here.
Document ID
20040062106
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Clark, Beth Ellen (Ithaca Coll. Ithaca, NY, United States)
Shepard, M. (Bloomsburg Univ. Bloomsburg, PA, United States)
Bus, S. J. (Hawaii Univ. HI, United States)
Vilas, F. (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Rivkin, A. S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. MA, United States)
Lim, L. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Lederer, S. (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Jarvis, K. (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Shah, S. (Ithaca Coll. Ithaca, NY, United States)
McConnochie, T. (Cornell Univ. NY, United States)
Date Acquired
August 21, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2004
Publication Information
Publication: Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Asteroids, Meteors, Comets
Subject Category
Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Public Use Permitted.

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IDRelationTitle20040062092Analytic PrimaryLunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Asteroids, Meteors, Comets
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