NASA Logo

NTRS

NTRS - NASA Technical Reports Server

Back to Results
Human otolith-ocular reflexes during off-vertical axis rotation: effect of frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity and motion sicknessThe purpose of this study was to examine how the modulation of tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation varies as a function of stimulus frequency. Eighteen human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 30 degrees off-vertical at stimulus frequencies between 0.05 and 0.8 Hz. The modulation of torsion decreased while the modulation of horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV) increased with increasing frequency. It is inferred that the ambiguity of otolith afferent information is greatest in the frequency region where tilt (torsion) and translational (horizontal SPV) otolith-ocular responses crossover. It is postulated that the previously demonstrated peak in motion sickness susceptibility during linear accelerations around 0.3 Hz is the result of frequency segregation of ambiguous otolith information being inadequate to distinguish between tilt and translation.
Document ID
20040088402
Document Type
Reprint (Version printed in journal)
Authors
Wood, Scott J. (Legacy Health System Suite 303, 1225 NE 2nd Avenue, Portland, OR 97232, United States)
Paloski, W. H.
Date Acquired
August 21, 2013
Publication Date
April 19, 2002
Publication Information
Publication: Neuroscience letters
Volume: 323
Issue: 1
ISSN: 0304-3940
Subject Category
Aerospace Medicine
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: DC 00205
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other
Keywords
NASA Discipline Neuroscience
NASA Center JSC