NASA Logo

NTRS

NTRS - NASA Technical Reports Server

Back to Results
Is there a role for nonsedating antihistamines in motion sickness? Fallout from space research may soon benefit your patientsThe rotating chair test, a novel research technique for simulating motion sickness, is used to study the effect of nonsedating oral antihistamines in preventing or forestalling motion sickness. After receiving terfenadine, astemizole, doxepin, or placebo, four groups of male volunteers were rotated at accelerating speed, and they made head movements out of the axis of rotation until they perceived that vomiting would occur if additional head movements were made. Those pretreated with doxepin or terfenadine experienced a statistically significant prophylactic effect, as measured by increased tolerance to Coriolis stimulation. This suggests that selective peripheral H1 antihistamine action may protect against motion sickness.
Document ID
20040089043
Document Type
Reprint (Version printed in journal)
Authors
Kohl, R. L. (University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston, United States)
Date Acquired
August 21, 2013
Publication Date
April 1, 1991
Publication Information
Publication: The Journal of respiratory diseases
Volume: 12
Issue: 4 Suppl
ISSN: 0194-259X
Subject Category
Aerospace Medicine
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other
Keywords
Clinical Trial
NASA Center JSC
Randomized Controlled Trial
NASA Discipline Neuroscience