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Record 1 of 961
Urinary excretion of cortisol from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) habituated to restraint
Author and Affiliation:
Wade, C. E.(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field CA United States)
Ortiz, R. M.
Abstract: Use of monkeys in research has often required that they be restrained in a chair. However, chair restraint can elicit an initial neuroendocrine stress response. Also, inactivity associated with restraint can induce muscular atrophy. We proposed that prior habituation of monkeys to chair restraint would attenuate these neuroendocrine responses without causing substantial muscle wasting. Four rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained and habituated to a restraint chair specifically designed for spaceflight. During the study, monkeys were placed in metabolic cages for 7 days (prerestraint, Phase I), placed in a chair restraint for 18 days (Phase II), and then returned to their metabolic cages for 5 days (postrestraint, Phase III). Urine was collected between 0700-1100 daily, and measurements of cortisol, creatinine, and electrolyte concentrations were adjusted for hourly excretion rates. Body weights of the monkeys did not change between start of the prerestraint and postrestraint phases (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs. 10.3 +/- 0.9 kg, respectively). During the 3 phases, mean excretion rate of cortisol did not change (24.1 +/- 10.3, 26.7 +/- 7.7, and 19.3 +/- 5.8 microg/h, respectively). Mean excretion rate of creatinine (37.3 +/- 7.5, 37.5 +/- 12.2, and 36.9 +/- 17.1 mg/h, respectively), Na+ (3.3 +/- 1.2, 3.2 +/- 1.2, 2.2 +/- 1.8 mmol/h, respectively), and K+ (5.3 +/- 1.8, 5.4 +/- 1.6, and 4.3 +/- 2.8 mmol/h, respectively) were also not altered. Lack of an increase in excreted urinary cortisol suggested that prior habituation to chair restraint attenuated neuroendocrine responses reported previously. Also, the chair restraint method used appeared to allow adequate activity, because the monkeys did not have indices of muscle wasting.
Publication Date: Sep 01, 1997
Document ID:
20040089421
(Acquired Sep 07, 2004)
Subject Category: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Contemporary topics in laboratory animal science / American Association for Laboratory Animal Science (ISSN 1060-0558); Volume 36; 5; 55-7
Publisher Information: United States
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: ALCOHOLS; CONSTRAINTS; EXCRETION; HABITUATION (LEARNING); HYDROXYCORTICOSTEROID; METABOLISM; MONKEYS; STEROIDS; STRESS (BIOLOGY); UROLOGY; ATROPHY; CREATININE; EATING; ETIOLOGY; MALES; POTASSIUM; SODIUM; URINE
Other Descriptors: HABITUATION (PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGY)/PHYSIOLOGY; HYDROCORTISONE/METABOLISM/URINE; RESTRAINT, PHYSICAL/ADVERSE EFFECTS/METHODS; STRESS/ETIOLOGY/PREVENTION & CONTROL; ANIMALS; CREATININE/METABOLISM/URINE; EATING; MACACA MULATTA; MALE; MUSCULAR ATROPHY/ETIOLOGY/PREVENTION & CONTROL; POTASSIUM/METABOLISM/URINE; SODIUM/METABOLISM/URINE; SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S; URINE; NASA CENTER ARC; NASA DISCIPLINE REGULATORY PHYSIOLOGY
Availability Source: Other Sources
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