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Record Details

Record 12 of 727
Plant productivity in controlled environments
Author and Affiliation:
Salisbury, F. B.(Utah State University, Plant Science Department, Logan 84322-4820, United States)
Bugbee, B.
Abstract: To assess the cost and area/volume requirements of a farm in a space station or Lunar or Martian base, a few laboratories in the United States, the Soviet Union, France, and Japan are studying optimum controlled environments for the production of selected crops. Temperature, light, photoperiod, CO2, humidity, the root-zone environment, and cultivars are the primary factors being manipulated to increase yields and harvest index. Our best wheat yields on a time basis (24 g m-2 day-1 of edible biomass) are five times good field yields and twice the world record. Similar yields have been obtained in other laboratories with potatoes and lettuce; soybeans are also promising. These figures suggest that approximately 30 m2 under continuous production could support an astronaut with sufficient protein and about 2800 kcal day-1. Scientists under Iosif Gitelzon in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, have lived in a closed system for up to 5 months, producing 80% of their own food. Thirty square meters for crops were allotted to each of the two men taking part in the experiment. A functional controlled-environment life-support system (CELSS) will require the refined application of several disciplines: controlled-environment agriculture, food preparation, waste disposal, and control-systems technology, to list only the broadest categories. It has seemed intuitively evident that ways could be found to prepare food, regenerate plant nutrients from wastes, and even control and integrate several subsystems of a CELSS. But could sufficient food be produced in the limited areas and with the limited energy that might be available? Clearly, detailed studies of food production were necessary.
Publication Date: Apr 01, 1988
Document ID:
20040090305
(Acquired Sep 07, 2004)
Subject Category: MAN/SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SUPPORT
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: HortScience : a publication of the American Society for Horticultural Science; p. 293-9; (ISSN 0018-5345); Volume 23; 2
Publisher Information: United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NCC2-139
Financial Sponsor: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field CA United States
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: CLOSED ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS; CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERES; ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL; FARM CROPS; LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS; PLANTS (BOTANY); PRODUCTIVITY; BIOMASS; HYDROPONICS; UNITED STATES; WHEAT
Other Descriptors: CROPS, AGRICULTURAL/GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT; ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS, CLOSED; ENVIRONMENT, CONTROLLED; LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS/INSTRUMENTATION; PLANTS, EDIBLE/GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT; BIOMASS; COMPARATIVE STUDY; HYDROPONICS; SPACE FLIGHT/INSTRUMENTATION; SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S; SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S; TRITICUM/GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT; UNITED STATES; UNITED STATES NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION; REVIEW; REVIEW, TUTORIAL; NASA DISCIPLINE LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS; NASA DISCIPLINE NUMBER 61-10; NASA PROGRAM CELSS; NON-NASA CENTER
Availability Source: Other Sources
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