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Record Details

Record 39 of 444
Vascular mechanics of the coronary artery
External Online Source: doi:10.1007/s003920070106
Author and Affiliation:
Veress, A. I.(Department of Biomed. Engineering, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio, United States)
Vince, D. G.
Anderson, P. M.
Cornhill, J. F.
Herderick, E. E.
Klingensmith, J. D.
Kuban, B. D.
Greenberg, N. L.
Thomas, J. D.
Abstract: This paper describes our research into the vascular mechanics of the coronary artery and plaque. The three sections describe the determination of arterial mechanical properties using intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), a constitutive relation for the arterial wall, and finite element method (FEM) models of the arterial wall and atheroma. METHODS: Inflation testing of porcine left anterior descending coronary arteries was conducted. The changes in the vessel geometry were monitored using IVUS, and intracoronary pressure was recorded using a pressure transducer. The creep and quasistatic stress/strain responses were determined. A Standard Linear Solid (SLS) was modified to reproduce the non-linear elastic behavior of the arterial wall. This Standard Non-linear Solid (SNS) was implemented into an axisymetric thick-walled cylinder numerical model. Finite element analysis models were created for five age groups and four levels of stenosis using the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis Youth (PDAY) database. RESULTS: The arteries exhibited non-linear elastic behavior. The total tissue creep strain was epsilon creep = 0.082 +/- 0.018 mm/mm. The numerical model could reproduce both the non-linearity of the porcine data and time dependent behavior of the arterial wall found in the literature with a correlation coefficient of 0.985. Increasing age had a strong positive correlation with the shoulder stress level, (r = 0.95). The 30% stenosis had the highest shoulder stress due to the combination of a fully formed lipid pool and a thin cap. CONCLUSIONS: Studying the solid mechanics of the arterial wall and the atheroma provide important insights into the mechanisms involved in plaque rupture.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2000
Document ID:
20040141602
(Acquired Nov 09, 2004)
Subject Category: LIFE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Zeitschrift fur Kardiologie (ISSN 0300-5860); Volume 89 Suppl 2; 92-100
Publisher Information: Germany
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: ARTERIES; ARTERIOSCLEROSIS; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE; HEART; PATHOLOGY; BIODYNAMICS; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; ELASTIC PROPERTIES; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; NONLINEAR SYSTEMS; SWINE
Other Descriptors: CORONARY ARTERIOSCLEROSIS/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY/ULTRASONOGRAPHY; CORONARY VESSELS/PHYSIOPATHOLOGY/ULTRASONOGRAPHY; ANIMALS; BIOMECHANICS; COMPUTER SIMULATION; ELASTICITY; ENDOSONOGRAPHY; FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS; NONLINEAR DYNAMICS; SWINE; NASA DISCIPLINE CARDIOPULMONARY; NASA PROGRAM BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND COUNTERMEASURES; NON-NASA CENTER
Availability Source: Other Sources
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