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Record 1 of 470
Haptic stabilization of posture: changes in arm proprioception and cutaneous feedback for different arm orientations
Author and Affiliation:
Rabin, E.(Brandeis University, Ashton Graybiel Spatial Orientation Laboratory and Volen Center for Complex Systems, Waltham, Massachusetts 02454, United States)
Bortolami, S. B.
DiZio, P.
Lackner, J. R.
Abstract: Postural sway during quiet stance is attenuated by actively maintained contact of the index finger with a stationary surface, even if the level of applied force (<1 N) cannot provide mechanical stabilization. In this situation, changes in force level at the fingertip lead changes in center of foot pressure by approximately 250 ms. These and related findings indicate that stimulation of the fingertip combined with proprioceptive information about the hand and arm can serve as an active sensor of body position relative to the point of contact. A geometric analysis of the relationship between hand and torso displacement during body sway led to the prediction that arm and hand proprioceptive and finger somatosensory information about body sway would be maximized with finger contact in the plane of body sway. Therefore, the most postural stabilization should be possible with such contact. To test this analysis, subjects touched a laterally versus anteriorly placed surface while in each of two stances: the heel-to-toe tandem Romberg stance that reduces medial-lateral stability and the heel-to-heel, toes-outward, knees-bent, "duck stance" that reduces fore-aft stability. Postural sway was always least with finger contact in the unstable plane: for the tandem stance, lateral fingertip contact was significantly more effective than frontal contact, and, for the duck stance, frontal contact was more effective than lateral fingertip contact. Force changes at the fingertip led changes in center of pressure of the feet by approximately 250 ms for both fingertip contact locations for both test stances. These results support the geometric analysis, which showed that 1) arm joint angles change by the largest amount when fingertip contact is maintained in the plane of greatest sway, and 2) the somatosensory cues at the fingertip provide both direction and amplitude information about sway when the finger is contacting a surface in the unstable plane.
Publication Date: Dec 01, 1999
Document ID:
20040141737
(Acquired Nov 09, 2004)
Subject Category: LIFE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Journal of neurophysiology (ISSN 0022-3077); Volume 82; 6; 3541-9
Publisher Information: United States
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: ARM (ANATOMY); FEEDBACK; FINGERS; MOTION; POSTURE; PROPRIOCEPTION; TOUCH; ADULTS; ALGORITHMS; FEMALES; HEAD MOVEMENT; LOAD CARRYING CAPACITY; MALES; SKIN (ANATOMY)
Other Descriptors: ARM/INNERVATION/PHYSIOLOGY; FEEDBACK/PHYSIOLOGY; FINGERS/INNERVATION/PHYSIOLOGY; MOVEMENT/PHYSIOLOGY; POSTURE/PHYSIOLOGY; PROPRIOCEPTION/PHYSIOLOGY; ADULT; ALGORITHMS; FEMALE; HEAD MOVEMENTS/PHYSIOLOGY; HUMAN; MALE; MIDDLE AGED; PRESSURE; SKIN/INNERVATION; SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; WEIGHT-BEARING; NASA DISCIPLINE SPACE HUMAN FACTORS; NASA PROGRAM BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH AND COUNTERMEASURES; NON-NASA CENTER; CLINICAL TRIAL
Availability Source: Other Sources
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