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Record Details

Record 57 of 13294
Evaluation of transit-time and electromagnetic flow measurement in a chronically instrumented nonhuman primate model
Author and Affiliation:
Koenig, S. C.(Armstrong Laboratory, Physiology Research Branch, Brooks AFB, Texas 78235-5117, United States)
Reister, C. A.
Schaub, J.
Swope, R. D.
Ewert, D.
Fanton, J. W.
Convertino, V. A. [Principal Investigator]
Abstract: The Physiology Research Branch at Brooks AFB conducts both human and nonhuman primate experiments to determine the effects of microgravity and hypergravity on the cardiovascular system and to identify the particular mechanisms that invoke these responses. Primary investigative efforts in our nonhuman primate model require the determination of total peripheral resistance, systemic arterial compliance, and pressure-volume loop characteristics. These calculations require beat-to-beat measurement of aortic flow. This study evaluated accuracy, linearity, biocompatability, and anatomical features of commercially available electromagnetic (EMF) and transit-time flow measurement techniques. Five rhesus monkeys were instrumented with either EMF (3 subjects) or transit-time (2 subjects) flow sensors encircling the proximal ascending aorta. Cardiac outputs computed from these transducers taken over ranges of 0.5 to 2.0 L/min were compared to values obtained using thermodilution. In vivo experiments demonstrated that the EMF probe produced an average error of 15% (r = .896) and 8.6% average linearity per reading, and the transit-time flow probe produced an average error of 6% (r = .955) and 5.3% average linearity per reading. Postoperative performance and biocompatability of the probes were maintained throughout the study. The transit-time sensors provided the advantages of greater accuracy, smaller size, and lighter weight than the EMF probes. In conclusion, the characteristic features and performance of the transit-time sensors were superior to those of the EMF sensors in this study.
Publication Date: Nov 01, 1996
Document ID:
20040173101
(Acquired Dec 09, 2004)
Subject Category: AEROSPACE MEDICINE
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Journal of investigative surgery : the official journal of the Academy of Surgical Research (ISSN 0894-1939); Volume 9; 6; 455-61
Publisher Information: United States
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: BLOOD FLOW; CARDIAC OUTPUT; ELECTROMAGNETIC MEASUREMENT; ELECTROMAGNETISM; FLOW MEASUREMENT; FLOW VELOCITY; HEMODYNAMICS; PRIMATES; TIME MEASUREMENT; TRANSIT TIME; AEROSPACE MEDICINE; AORTA; ARTERIES; BIOASTRONAUTICS; BIOCOMPATIBILITY; EVALUATION; HEART; MALES; MONKEYS; SURGERY; TIME DEPENDENCE
Other Descriptors: BLOOD FLOW VELOCITY/PHYSIOLOGY; CARDIAC OUTPUT/PHYSIOLOGY; ELECTROMAGNETICS/INSTRUMENTATION; HEMODYNAMIC PROCESSES/PHYSIOLOGY; ANIMALS; AORTA/PHYSIOLOGY; BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS; CARDIAC SURGICAL PROCEDURES/INSTRUMENTATION; EVALUATION STUDIES; MACACA MULATTA; MALE; PULMONARY ARTERY/PHYSIOLOGY; SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S; TIME FACTORS; NASA DISCIPLINE CARDIOPULMONARY; NASA DISCIPLINE NUMBER 14-10; NASA PROGRAM SPACE PHYSIOLOGY AND COUNTERMEASURES; NON-NASA CENTER
Availability Source: Other Sources
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