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Record Details

Record 5 of 2118
Effect of space flight on cytokine production and other immunologic parameters of rhesus monkeys
Author and Affiliation:
Sonnenfeld, G.(Carolinas Medical Center, Department of General Surgery Research, Charlotte, NC 28232-2861, United States)
Davis, S.
Taylor, G. R.
Mandel, A. D.
Konstantinova, I. V.
Lesnyak, A.
Fuchs, B. B.
Peres, C.
Tkackzuk, J.
Schmitt, D. A.
Abstract: During a recent flight of a Russian satellite (Cosmos #2229), initial experiments examining the effects of space flight on immunologic responses of rhesus monkeys were performed to gain insight into the effect of space flight on resistance to infection. Experiments were performed on tissue samples taken from the monkeys before and immediately after flight. Additional samples were obtained approximately 1 month after flight for a postflight restraint study. Two types of experiments were carried out throughout this study. The first experiment determined the ability of leukocytes to produce interleukin-1 and to express interleukin-2 receptors. The second experiment examined the responsiveness of rhesus bone marrow cells to recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Human reagents that cross-reacted with monkey tissue were utilized for the bulk of the studies. Results from both studies indicated that there were changes in immunologic function attributable to space flight. Interleukin-1 production and the expression of interleukin-2 receptors was decreased after space flight. Bone marrow cells from flight monkeys showed a significant decrease in their response to GM-CSF compared with the response of bone marrow cells from nonflight control monkeys. These results suggest that the rhesus monkey may be a useful surrogate for humans in future studies that examine the effect of space flight on immune response, particularly when conditions do not readily permit human study.
Publication Date: May 01, 1996
Document ID:
20040173226
(Acquired Dec 09, 2004)
Subject Category: LIFE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Journal of interferon & cytokine research : the official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research; p. 409-15; (ISSN 1079-9907); Volume 16; 5
Publisher Information: United States
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: INTERLEUKINS; LEUKOCYTES; MONKEYS; COSMOS SATELLITES; MALES; MODELS
Other Descriptors: INTERLEUKIN-1/BIOSYNTHESIS; LEUKOCYTES, MONONUCLEAR/METABOLISM; RECEPTORS, INTERLEUKIN-2/BIOSYNTHESIS; SPACE FLIGHT; ANIMALS; GRANULOCYTE-MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR/PHYSIOLOGY; HUMAN; MACACA MULATTA; MALE; MODELS, BIOLOGICAL; REPRODUCIBILITY OF RESULTS; SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S; NASA DISCIPLINE REGULATORY PHYSIOLOGY; NASA EXPERIMENT NUMBER COS 2229-2; NON-NASA CENTER; COSMOS 2229 PROJECT; FLIGHT EXPERIMENT; SHORT DURATION; UNMANNED
Availability Source: Other Sources
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