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Record Details

Record 20 of 12971
Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis
Author and Affiliation:
Sakhaee, K.(University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research, Dallas)
Williams, R. H.
Oh, M. S.
Padalino, P.
Adams-Huet, B.
Whitson, P.
Pak, C. Y.
Abstract: The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).
Publication Date: Jul 01, 1993
Document ID:
20050000449
(Acquired Jan 06, 2005)
Subject Category: AEROSPACE MEDICINE
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ISSN 0884-0431); Volume 8; 7; 789-94
Publisher Information: United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: M01-RR00633; P01-DK20543
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: ALKALIES; CALCIUM; CITRATES; EXCRETION; KIDNEY STONES; METABOLISM; ADULTS; AEROSPACE MEDICINE; AGE FACTOR; BIOASTRONAUTICS; CITRIC ACID; FEMALES; KIDNEYS; MALES
Other Descriptors: ALKALIES/METABOLISM; CITRATES/THERAPEUTIC USE/URINE; INTESTINAL ABSORPTION; KIDNEY CALCULI/METABOLISM/URINE; ACIDOSIS, RENAL TUBULAR/METABOLISM/URINE; ADULT; AGED; CALCIUM; CITRIC ACID; COMPARATIVE STUDY; FEMALE; HUMAN; MALE; MIDDLE AGED; SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S; SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S; NASA CENTER JSC; NASA DISCIPLINE NUMBER 18-10; NASA DISCIPLINE REGULATORY PHYSIOLOGY; NASA PROGRAM SPACE PHYSIOLOGY AND COUNTERMEASURES; NON-NASA CENTER
Availability Source: Other Sources
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