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Record Details

Record 77 of 42487
Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air
Author and Affiliation:
Reigel, Marissa M.(Colorado School of Mines, Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Golden, CO, United States)
Abstract: High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2004
Document ID:
20050186586
(Acquired Jul 12, 2005)
Subject Category: ELECTRONICS AND ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: Research Symposium II; (SEE 20050186580)
Meeting Sponsor: NASA Glenn Research Center; Cleveland, OH, United States
Financial Sponsor: Colorado School of Mines; Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Golden, CO, United States
Organization Source: Colorado School of Mines; Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Golden, CO, United States
Description: In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: WIRE; HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS; HIGH TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENTS; MORPHOLOGY; THERMAL STRESSES; WEAR RESISTANCE
Availability Notes: Abstract Only; Available from STI Support Services only as part of the entire parent document
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