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Record 1 of 1197
Flood and Landslide Applications of High Time Resolution Satellite Rain Products
Author and Affiliation:
Adler, Robert F.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Hong, Yang(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Huffman, George J.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Abstract: Experimental, potentially real-time systems to detect floods and landslides related to heavy rain events are described. A key basis for these applications is high time resolution satellite rainfall analyses. Rainfall is the primary cause for devastating floods across the world. However, in many countries, satellite-based precipitation estimation may be the best source of rainfall data due to insufficient ground networks and absence of data sharing along many trans-boundary river basins. Remotely sensed precipitation from the NASA's TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) operational system (near real-time precipitation at a spatial-temporal resolution of 3 hours and 0.25deg x 0.25deg) is used to monitor extreme precipitation events. Then these data are ingested into a macro-scale hydrological model which is parameterized using spatially distributed elevation, soil and land cover datasets available globally from satellite remote sensing. Preliminary flood results appear reasonable in terms of location and frequency of events, with implementation on a quasi-global basis underway. With the availability of satellite rainfall analyses at fine time resolution, it has also become possible to assess landslide risk on a near-global basis. Early results show that landslide occurrence is closely associated with the spatial patterns and temporal distribution of TRMM rainfall characteristics. Particularly, the number of landslides triggered by rainfall is related to rainfall climatology, antecedent rainfall accumulation, and intensity-duration of rainstorms. For the purpose of prediction, an empirical TMPA-based rainfall intensity-duration threshold is developed and shown to have skill in determining potential areas of landslides. These experimental findings, in combination with landslide surface susceptibility information based on satellite-based land surface information, form a starting point towards a potential operational landslide monitoring/warning system around the globe.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2006
Document ID:
20070008091
(Acquired Mar 02, 2007)
Subject Category: METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: International Precipitation Working Group; 20-30 Oct. 2006; Melbourne; Australia
Meeting Sponsor: World Meteorological Organization; unknown
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: RAIN; FLOODS; LANDSLIDES; HYDROLOGY MODELS; CLIMATOLOGY; WARNING SYSTEMS; REAL TIME OPERATION; REMOTE SENSING; TRMM SATELLITE; EARTH SURFACE; TEMPORAL RESOLUTION; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; SATELLITE OBSERVATION; POSITION (LOCATION)
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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