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Record 1 of 1728
Vertical Jump Height is more Strongly Associated with Velocity and Work Performed Prior to Take-off
Author and Affiliation:
Bentley, J. R.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Loehr, J. A.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
DeWitt, J. K.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Lee, S. M. C.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
English, K. L.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Nash, R. E.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Leach, M. A.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Hagan, R. D.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Abstract: Vertical jump (VJ) height is commonly used as a measure of athletic capability in strength and power sports. Although VJ has been shown to be a predictor of athletic performance, it is not clear which kinetic ground reaction force (GRF) variables, such as peak force (PF), peak power (PP), peak velocity (PV), total work (TW) or impulse (Imp) are the best correlates. To determine which kinetic variables (PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp) best correlate with VJ height. Twenty subjects (14 males, 6 females) performed three maximal countermovement VJs on a force platform (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA). VJ jump height was calculated as the difference between standing reach and the highest reach point measured using a Vertec. PF, PP, PV, TW, and Imp were calculated using the vertical GRF data sampled at 1000 Hz from the lowest point in the countermovement through the concentric portion until take-off. GRF data were normalized to body mass measured using a standard scale (Detecto, Webb City, MO, USA). Correlation coefficients were computed between each GRF variable and VJ height using a Pearson correlation. VJ height (43.4 plus or minus 9.1 cm) was significantly correlated (p less than 0.001) with PF (998 plus or minus 321 N; r=0.51), PP (1997 plus or minus 772 W; r=0.69), PV (2.66 plus or minus 0.40 m (raised dot) s(sup -1); r=0.85), TW (259 plus or minus 93.0 kJ; r=0.82), and Imp (204 plus or minus 51.1 N(raised dot)s; r=0.67). Although all variables were correlated to VJ height, PV and TW were more strongly correlated to VJ height than PF, PP, and Imp. Therefore, since TW is equal to force times displacement, the relative displacement of the center of mass along with the forces applied during the upward movement of the jump are critical determinants of VJ height. PV and TW are key determinants of VJ height, and therefore successful training programs to increase VJ height should focus on rapid movement (PV) and TW by increasing power over time rather than focusing on PF alone.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2008
Document ID:
20080013420
(Acquired Mar 24, 2008)
Subject Category: AEROSPACE MEDICINE
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: National Strength and Conditioning Association; 9-12 Jul. 2008; Las Vegas, NV; United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Organization Source: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright
NASA Terms: PHYSICAL EXERCISE; HEIGHT; SPORTS MEDICINE; BODY KINEMATICS; VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION; CORRELATION COEFFICIENTS; DISPLACEMENT; MALES; WEIGHT (MASS); ACCELERATION (PHYSICS); KINETICS
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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