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Record 20 of 1286
High- and low-LET Radiation-induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured in 3-dimensional Matrices
Author and Affiliation:
Hada, M.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
George K.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Cucinotta, F. A.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Wu, H.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Abstract: Energetic heavy ions pose a great health risk to astronauts who participate in extended ISS missions and will be an even greater concern for future manned lunar and Mars missions. High-LET heavy ions are particularly effective in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, which can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Previously, we had studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells cultured in 2-dimension (2D) using the multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. However, it has been realized that the biological response to radiation insult in a 2D in vitro cellular environment can differ significantly from the response in 3-dimension (3D) or at the actual tissue level. In this study, we cultured human epithelial cells in 3D to provide a more suitable model for human tissue. Human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) were grown in Matrigel to form 3D structures, and exposed to Fe-ions at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory or 137Cs-gamma radiation source at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. After exposure, cells were allowed to repair for 16hr before dissociation and subcultured at low density in 2D. G2 and metaphase chromosomes in the first cell cycle were collected in the first cell cycle after irradiation using a chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique, and chromosome aberrations were analyzed using mBAND technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of interchromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intrachromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Our data indicate a significant difference in the chromosome aberration yield between 2D and 3D cell cultures after gamma exposures, but not after Fe ion exposures. Therefore, the Relative Biological Effect (RBE) for induction of chromosome aberrations obtained in a 2D model may not accurately represent RBE values obtained for tissue exposure.
Publication Date: Jan 01, 2008
Document ID:
20080013533
(Acquired Mar 27, 2008)
Subject Category: SPACE RADIATION
Document Type: Preprint
Meeting Information: 54th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society; 21-25 Sep. 2008; Boston, MA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: Radiation Research Society; Lawrence, KS, United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Organization Source: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: HEAVY IONS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; GENETICS; MUTATIONS; CATARACTS; CANCER; CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS; PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES; RELATIVE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS (RBE); MANNED MARS MISSIONS; IN VITRO METHODS AND TESTS; RISK; IRRADIATION; EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIATION
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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