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Record Details

Record 1 of 1950
The Bess-Polar II Long Duration Flight Above Antarctica
Author and Affiliation:
Sasaki, Makoto(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Yamamoto, Akira(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan)
Yoshimura, Koji(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan)
Makida, Yasuhiro(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan)
Matsuda, Shinya(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan)
Hasegawa, Masaya(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan)
Horikoshi, Atsushi(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan)
Tanaka, Ken-ichi(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan)
Suzuki, Junichi(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan)
Nishimura, Jun(Tokyo Univ., Japan) Show more authors
Abstract: The Balloon-borne Experiment with a Superconducting Spectrometer, BESS, has been developed to study elementary particle phenomena in the early universe through measurements of low energy antiprotons to investigate their origin and through a search for antihelium. The BESS collaboration carried out nine northern latitude flights between 1993 and 2002. BESS-Polar is an advanced program of the BESS collaboration to study these topics with much greater precision using long duration flights above Antarctica. The BESS-Polar spectrometer was successfully developed to accumulate much larger numbers of events during long duration flights around the South Pole. Approximately a factor of four reductions in the amount of material in the particle beam enables measurement of much lower energy antiprotons down to 100 MeV (at top of atmosphere). The first BESS-Polar flight (BESS-Polar I) of 8.5 days was carried out above Antarctica in December 2004. recording 900 million cosmic-ray events. The second BESS-Polar flight (BESS-Polar 11) was successfully carried out in the austral summer season of 2007-2008. Based on experience with BESS-Polar I, the spectrometer was improved in performance and achieved long term stability during the flight. A newly constructed magnet with a larger liquid He capacity and improved thermal insulation and an upgraded data storage system with larger capacity of hard disk drives (HDDs) enabled longer observation time. BESS-Polar II was launched on December 22, 2007 from Williams Field, McMurdo Station, in Antarctica. The spectrometer worked properly and observed cosmic rays for about 24.5 days at float altitude, recording 4.6 billion events on the HDDs until the limit of the magnet operation was reached on January 16, 2008. The flight was terminated and the spectrometer was safely landed on the West Antarctic ice sheet (1000 km from the South Pole) on January 21, 2008. Here, the BESS-Polar instrument is discussed, highlighting improvements made for BESS-Polar II, and overviews of the flight and performance are reported.
Publication Date: Jul 13, 2008
Document ID:
20080043930
(Acquired Nov 12, 2008)
Subject Category: EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: 37th COSPAR Scientific Assembly 2008; 13-20 Jul. 2008; Montreal; Canada
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNG06EO90A
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Description: 2p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: BESS (SATELLITE); BALLOON-BORNE INSTRUMENTS; SPECTROMETERS; SATELLITE DESIGN; DESIGN OPTIMIZATION; SPACECRAFT PERFORMANCE; REMOTE SENSING; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; ANTARCTIC REGIONS; ANTIPROTONS; PARTICLE BEAMS; COSMIC RAYS
Availability Source: Other Sources
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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