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Launch-Off-Need Shuttle Hubble Rescue Mission: Medical IssuesThe Space Shuttle Hubble repair mission (STS-125) is unique in that a rescue mission (STS-400) has to be ready to launch before STS-125 life support runs out should the vehicle become stranded. The shuttle uses electrical power derived from fuel cells that use cryogenic oxygen and hydrogen (CRYO) to run all subsystems including the Environmental Control System. If the STS-125 crew cannot return to Earth due to failure of a critical subsystem, they must power down all nonessential systems and wait to be rescued by STS-400. This power down will cause the cabin temperature to be 60 F or less and freeze the rest of the vehicle, preventing it from attempting a reentry. After an emergency has been declared, STS-125 must wait at least 7 days to power down since that is the earliest that STS-400 can be launched. Problem The delayed power down of STS-125 causes CYRO to be consumed at high rates and limits the survival time after STS-400 launches to 10 days or less. CRYO will run out sooner every day that the STS-400 launch is delayed (weather at launch, technical issues etc.). To preserve CRYO and lithium hydroxide (LiOH - carbon dioxide removal) the crew will perform no exercise to reduce their metabolic rates, yet each deconditioned STS-125 crewmember must perform an EVA to rescue himself. The cabin may be cold for 10 days, which may cause shivering, increasing the metabolic rate of the STS-125 crew. Solution To preserve LiOH, the STS-125 manifest includes nutrition bars with low carbohydrate content to maintain crew respiratory quotient (RQ) below 0.85 as opposed to the usual shuttle galley food which is rich in carbohydrates and keeps the RQ at approximately 0.95. To keep the crew more comfortable in the cold vehicle warm clothing also has been included. However, with no exercise and limited diet, the deconditioned STS-125 crew returning on STS-400 may not be able to egress the vehicle autonomously requiring a supplemented crash-and-rescue capability.
Document ID
20080045884
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Hamilton, Douglas (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Gillis, David (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Ilcus, Linda (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Perchonok, Michele (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Polk, James (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Brandt, Keith (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Powers, Edward (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Stepaniak, Phillip (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Date Acquired
August 24, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2008
Subject Category
Aerospace Medicine
Meeting Information
80th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Aerospace Medical Association (ASMA)(Los Angeles, CA)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other