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Record 1 of 3583
The Cosmic Ray Electron Excess
External Online Source: doi:10.1038/nature07477
Author and Affiliation:
Chang, J.(Purple Mountain Observatory, Nanjing, China)
Adams, J. H.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States)
Ahn, H. S.(Maryland Univ., Inst. for Physical Science and Technology, College Park, MD, United States)
Bashindzhagyan, G. L.(Moscow State Univ., Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Russian Federation)
Christl, M.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States)
Ganel, O.(Maryland Univ., Inst. for Physical Science and Technology, College Park, MD, United States)
Guzik, T. G.(Louisiana State Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Baton Rouge, LA, United States)
Isbert, J.(Louisiana State Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Baton Rouge, LA, United States)
Kim, K. C.(Maryland Univ., Inst. for Physical Science and Technology, College Park, MD, United States)
Kuznetsov, E. N.(Moscow State Univ., Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Russian Federation) Show more authors
Abstract: This slide presentation reviews the possible sources for the apparent excess of Cosmic Ray Electrons. The presentation reviews the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) instrument, the various parts, how cosmic ray electrons are measured, and shows graphs that review the results of the ATIC instrument measurement. A review of Cosmic Ray Electrons models is explored, along with the source candidates. Scenarios for the excess are reviewed: Supernova remnants (SNR) Pulsar Wind nebulae, or Microquasars. Each of these has some problem that mitigates the argument. The last possibility discussed is Dark Matter. The Anti-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA) mission is to search for evidence of annihilations of dark matter particles, to search for anti-nuclei, to test cosmic-ray propagation models, and to measure electron and positron spectra. There are slides explaining the results of Pamela and how to compare these with those of the ATIC experiment. Dark matter annihilation is then reviewed, which represent two types of dark matter: Neutralinos, and kaluza-Kline (KK) particles, which are next explained. The future astrophysical measurements, those from GLAST LAT, the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and HEPCAT are reviewed, in light of assisting in finding an explanation for the observed excess. Also the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could help by revealing if there are extra dimensions.
Publication Date: Nov 20, 2008
Document ID:
20090023605
(Acquired Jun 26, 2009)
Subject Category: ASTROPHYSICS
Report/Patent Number: M09-0439, M09-0440
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Nature; p. 362-365; Volume 456
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Organization Source: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Description: 43p; In English; Original contains color and black and white illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: COSMIC RAYS; DARK MATTER; ELECTRONS; ENERGY SPECTRA; SUPERNOVA REMNANTS; ALPHA MAGNETIC SPECTROMETER; ANTIPARTICLES; CALORIMETERS; ANNIHILATION REACTIONS
Availability Source: Other Sources
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