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Record Details

Record 4 of 2447
An Efficient Approach for the Reliability Analysis of Phased-Mission Systems with Dependent Failures
External Online Source: hdl:2014/41318
Author and Affiliation:
Xing, Liudong(Massachusetts Univ., Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Dartmouth, MA, United States)
Meshkat, Leila(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Donahue, Susan K.(Virginia Union Univ., Dept. of Systems and Information Engineering, VA, United States)
Abstract: We consider the reliability analysis of phased-mission systems with common-cause failures in this paper. Phased-mission systems (PMS) are systems supporting missions characterized by multiple, consecutive, and nonoverlapping phases of operation. System components may be subject to different stresses as well as different reliability requirements throughout the course of the mission. As a result, component behavior and relationships may need to be modeled differently from phase to phase when performing a system-level reliability analysis. This consideration poses unique challenges to existing analysis methods. The challenges increase when common-cause failures (CCF) are incorporated in the model. CCF are multiple dependent component failures within a system that are a direct result of a shared root cause, such as sabotage, flood, earthquake, power outage, or human errors. It has been shown by many reliability studies that CCF tend to increase a system's joint failure probabilities and thus contribute significantly to the overall unreliability of systems subject to CCF.We propose a separable phase-modular approach to the reliability analysis of phased-mission systems with dependent common-cause failures as one way to meet the above challenges in an efficient and elegant manner. Our methodology is twofold: first, we separate the effects of CCF from the PMS analysis using the total probability theorem and the common-cause event space developed based on the elementary common-causes; next, we apply an efficient phase-modular approach to analyze the reliability of the PMS. The phase-modular approach employs both combinatorial binary decision diagram and Markov-chain solution methods as appropriate. We provide an example of a reliability analysis of a PMS with both static and dynamic phases as well as CCF as an illustration of our proposed approach. The example is based on information extracted from a Mars orbiter project. The reliability model for this orbiter considers the various phases of Launch, Cruise, Mars Orbit Insertion, and Orbit. Some of the CCF for the orbiter in this mission include environmental effects, such as micrometeoroids, human operator errors, and software errors.
Publication Date: May 01, 2006
Document ID:
20090026417
(Acquired Jul 27, 2009)
Subject Category: STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: 8th International Conference on Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Management; 14-19 May 2006; New Orleans, LA; United States
Financial Sponsor: Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech.; Pasadena, CA, United States
Organization Source: Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech.; Pasadena, CA, United States
Description: 9p; In English; Original contains black and white illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: RELIABILITY ANALYSIS; COMBINATORIAL ANALYSIS; ORBIT INSERTION; PROBABILITY THEORY; MARKOV CHAINS; FAILURE; COMPUTER PROGRAMS; RELIABILITY; ENVIRONMENT EFFECTS; LAUNCHING; THEOREMS
Other Descriptors: PHASED MISSION SYSTEMS; RELIABILITY ANALYSIS; COMMON CAUSE
Availability Source: Other Sources
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