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Defining the Physiological Factors that Contribute to Postflight Changes in Functional PerformanceAstronauts experience alterations in multiple physiological systems due to exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight. These physiological changes include sensorimotor disturbances, cardiovascular deconditioning and loss of muscle mass and strength. These changes might affect the ability of crewmembers to perform critical mission tasks immediately after landing on lunar and Martian surfaces. To date, changes in functional performance have not been systematically studied or correlated with physiological changes. To understand how changes in physiological function impact functional performance an interdisciplinary pre/postflight testing regimen (Functional Task Test, FTT) has been developed that systematically evaluates both astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The overall objective of the FTT is to identify the key underlying physiological factors that contribute to performance of functional tests that are representative of critical mission tasks. This study will identify which physiological systems contribute the most to impaired performance on each functional test. This will allow us to identify the physiological systems that play the largest role in decrement in functional performance. Using this information we can then design and implement countermeasures that specifically target the physiological systems most responsible for the altered functional performance associated with space flight. The functional test battery was designed to address high priority tasks identified by the Constellation program as critical for mission success. The set of functional tests making up the FTT include the: 1) Seat Egress and Walk Test, 2) Ladder Climb Test, 3) Recovery from Fall/Stand Test, 4) Rock Translation Test, 5) Jump Down Test, 6) Torque Generation Test, and 7) Construction Activity Board Test. Corresponding physiological measures include assessments of postural and gait control, dynamic visual acuity, fine motor control, plasma volume, orthostatic intolerance, upper and lower body muscle strength, power, fatigue, control and neuromuscular drive. Crewmembers perform both functional and physiological tests before and after short (Shuttle) and long-duration (ISS) space flight. Data are collected on R+0 (Shuttle only), R+1, R+6 and R+30.
Document ID
20090040734
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Bloomberg, J. J. (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Arzeno, N. (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Buxton, R. (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Feiveson, A. H. (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Kofman, I. (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Lawrence, E. (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Lee, S. M. C. (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Mulavara, A. P. (Universities Space Research Association Houston, TX, United States)
Peters, B. T. (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Platts, S. H. (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Ploutz-Snyder, L. (Universities Space Research Association Houston, TX, United States)
Reschke, M. F. (NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, TX, United States)
Ryder, J. (Universities Space Research Association Houston, TX, United States)
Spiering, B. A. (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Stenger, M. B. (Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group Houston, TX, United States)
Wood, S. (Universities Space Research Association Houston, TX, United States)
Date Acquired
September 8, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2009
Subject Category
Aerospace Medicine
Report/Patent Number
JSC-CN-19371
Meeting Information
NASA Human Research Program Investigators'' Workshop(Houston, TX)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other