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International Space Station as a Base Camp for Exploration Beyond Low Earth OrbitThe idea for using the International Space Station (ISS) as platform for exploration has matured in the past year and the concept continues to gain momentum. ISS provides a robust infrastructure which can be used to test systems and capabilities needed for missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids and other potential destinations. International cooperation is a critical enabler and ISS has already demonstrated successful management of a large multi-national technical endeavor. Systems and resources needed for expeditions can be aggregated and thoroughly tested at ISS before departure thus providing wide operational flexibility and the best assurance of mission success. A small part of ISS called an Exploration Platform (ISS-EP) can be placed at Earth-Moon Libration point 1 (EML1) providing immediate benefits and flexibility for future exploration missions. We will show how ISS and the ISS-EP can be used to reduce risk and improve the operational flexibility for missions beyond low earth orbit. Life support systems and other technology developed for ISS can be evolved and adapted to the ISS-EP and other exploration spacecraft. New technology, such as electric propulsion and advanced life support systems can be tested and proven at ISS as part of an incremental development program. Commercial companies who are introducing transportation and other services will benefit with opportunities to contribute to the mission since ISS will serve as a focal point for the commercialization of low earth orbit services. Finally, we will show how use of ISS provides immediate benefits to the scientific community because its capabilities are available today and certain critical aspects of exploration missions can be simulated.
Document ID
20110015487
Document Type
Conference Paper
Authors
Raftery, Michael (Boeing Defense and Space Group Houston, TX, United States)
Hoffman, Jeffrey (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech. Cambridge, MA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 25, 2013
Publication Date
January 1, 2011
Subject Category
Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
Report/Patent Number
JSC-CN-24625
IAC-11-B3.1
Meeting Information
62nd International Astronantical Congress(Cape Town)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other