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Spontaneous Raman Scattering Diagnostics: Applications in Practical Combustion Systems. Chapter 5
Author and Affiliation:
Kojima, Jun(Ohio Aerospace Inst., Cleveland, OH, United States)
Viet-Nguyen, Quang(Ohio Aerospace Inst., Cleveland, OH, United States)
Lackner, Maximilian [Editor](Wien Univ. of Technology, Inst. of Chemical Engineering, Austria)
Winter, Franz [Editor](Wien Univ. of Technology, Inst. of Chemical Engineering, Austria)
Agarwal, Avinash [Editor](Indian Inst. of Tech., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Kanpur, India)
Abstract: In this chapter, the recent advancements and practical aspects of laser SRS diagnostics have been reviewed wi til regards to applications in practical combustion systems. Clearly, SRS represents a theoretically and experimentally mature diagnostic technology that has become an essential tool for multiscalar measurements in turbulent combustion at elevated pressures. Today, time-, space-, spectrally, and even polarization-resolved S RS diagnostics is at hand, with aid from recent innovations in theoretical and technological developments on electro-optical or electromechanical devices. Whilst a linear increase in SRS signals can be expected in high-pressure systems (this is perhaps one of the most important advantages for using SRS in high-pressure systems), there are practical (often severe) restrictions associated with pressurized vessels, due mainly to the limited degree of optical access. This narrows ti,e available choice of diagnostics that can be employed at any given time. Point-wise SRS diagnostics provides the highest accuracy on the chemical species and temperature measurements, and will continue to remain a vital approach for the study in such harsh environments. The practical design considerations and hands-on set-up guide for SRS diagnostics provided in this chapter are rarely presented elsewhere. Although the second-harmonic Nd:YAG pulsed laser (532 nm), combined with pulse-stretching optics or the recently introduced White Cell-based laser, seems to be the most favored excitation source of choice by the research community, UV excitation will undoubtedly continue to be used on many occasions, and especially in sooting flames. Detection methods may be divided into ICCD-based nanosecond-gate detection or a rotary-chopper electromechanical shutter-based CCD array detection, and the levels of background flame emission in individual cases would determine this critical design choice. Here, a process of Raman signal calibration based on ti,e crosstalk matrix formalism was explained step-by-step. As tI,is process may be very time-consuming and expensive, a well-planned experimental approach (01' building a transferable calibration database or library (at least with in a user's own facility over a series of different testing and runs) is vitally important. Hands on advice on the design and construction of flow control systems for high pressure burner facilities were also presented.
Publication Date: Jul 01, 2010
Document ID:
20120002937
(Acquired Mar 06, 2012)
Subject Category: SPACECRAFT PROPULSION AND POWER
ISBN: ISBN 978-3-527-32449-1
Document Type: Book Chapter
Publication Information: Handbook of Combustion: Combustion Diagnostics and Pollutants; Volume 2; 126-155
Publisher Information: Wiley-VCH
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNC08ZA01A
Financial Sponsor: NASA Glenn Research Center; Cleveland, OH, United States
Organization Source: Ohio Aerospace Inst.; Cleveland, OH, United States
Description: 17p; In English; Original contains color and black and white illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: COMBUSTION; RAMAN SPECTRA; TURBULENT COMBUSTION; PULSED LASERS; HIGH PRESSURE; DIAGNOSIS; ELECTROMECHANICS; CHARGE COUPLED DEVICES; OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES; YAG LASERS; NEODYMIUM LASERS; ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION; TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT
Availability Source: Other Sources
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