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Record 1 of 1106
Science of Opportunity: Heliophysics on the FASTSAT Mission and STP-S26
External Online Source: doi:10.1109/AERO.2011.5747235
Author and Affiliation:
Rowland, Douglas E.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Collier, Michael R.
Sigwarth, John B.
Jones, Sarah L.
Hill, Joanne K.
Benson, Robert
Choi, Michael
Chornay, Dennis
Cooper, John
Feng, Steven Show more authors
Abstract: The FASTSAT spacecraft, which was launched on November 19, 2010 on the DoD STP-S26 mission, carries three instruments developed in joint collaboration by NASA GSFC and the US Naval Academy: PISA, TTl, and MINI_ME.I,1 As part of a rapid-development, low-cost instrument design and fabrication program, these instruments were a perfect match for FASTSAT, which was designed and built in less than one year. These instruments, while independently developed, provide a collaborative view of important processes in the upper atmosphere relating to solar and energetic particle input, atmospheric response, and ion outflow. PISA measures in-situ irregularities in electron number density, TIl provides limb measurements of the atomic oxygen temperature profile with altitude, and MINI-ME provides a unique look at ion populations by a remote sen sing technique involving neutral atom imaging. Together with other instruments and payloads on STP-S26 such as the NSF RAX mission, FalconSat-5, and NanoSail-D (launched as a tertiary payload from FASTSAT), these instruments provide a valuable "constellation of opportunity" for following the now of energy and charged and neutral particles through the upper atmosphere. Together, and for a small fraction of the price of a major mission, these spacecraft will measure the energetic electrons impacting the upper atmosphere, the ions leaving it, and the large-scale plasma and neutral response to these energy inputs. The result will be a new model for maximizing scientific return from multiple small, distributed payloads as secondary payloads on a larger launch vehicle.
Publication Date: Mar 05, 2011
Document ID:
20120012568
(Acquired Aug 10, 2012)
Subject Category: SPACECRAFT INSTRUMENTATION AND ASTRIONICS
Report/Patent Number: GSFC.JA.01239.2012
Document Type: Journal Article
Publisher Information: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, New York, NY, United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Description: 12p; In English; Original contains color and black and white illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: SMALL SCIENTIFIC SATELLITES; PAYLOADS; SATELLITE INSTRUMENTS; SPACE WEATHER; SOLAR ACTIVITY EFFECTS; INSTRUMENT PACKAGES; LOW COST; SOLAR PHYSICS; PAYLOAD INTEGRATION
Miscellaneous Notes: This paper appears in Aerospace Conference, 2011 IEEE on 5-12 March 2011
Availability Source: Other Sources
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