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Laser Photonic Propulsion Force for Station-Keeping Applications
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Author and Affiliation:
Perez, Andres Dono(Universities Space Research Association, Moffett Field, CA, United States);
Yang, Fan Yang(Science and Technology Corp., Moffett Field, CA, United States);
Foster, Cyrus(Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (SGT, Inc.), Moffett Field, CA, United States);
Faber, Nicolas(Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (SGT, Inc.), Moffett Field, CA, United States);
Jonsson, Jonas(Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (SGT, Inc.), Moffett Field, CA, United States);
Stupl, Jan(Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (SGT, Inc.), Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Abstract: Small satellites, e.g. cubesats, do not tend to incorporate propulsion subsystems that can compensate for perturbation forces, which causes orbital decay. Cubesats are especially susceptible to the phenomenon of orbital decay, which limits their potential performance, since these effects are more noticeable in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). We postulate that a network of ground-based lasers could extend the operational lifetimes of these satellites by applying a photonic force onto their surfaces. This boosting force would help to counteract the degrading force, which is mainly produced by the drag of the atmosphere. This solution may present an advantage for low cost missions, in that it would enable longer mission durations without the need to incorporate a propulsion system, which comprises a large part of the mass budget and the power constraints of a satellite. This poster presents an analysis of the trade space for both the required network of laser ground stations and the satellite orbits. The analysis is based on simulations of the orbital decay of model satellites.
Publication Date: Aug 02, 2014
Document ID:
20140013279
(Acquired Dec 09, 2014)
Subject Category: ASTRODYNAMICS
Report/Patent Number: ARC-E-DAA-TN16434
Document Type: Oral/Visual Presentation
Meeting Information: Annual American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)/Utah State University (USU)Conference on Small Satellites; 28th; 2-7 Aug. 2014; Logan, UT; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Reston, VA, United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNA10DF26C; NNA08CG83C; NNA13AC87C; NNX09AG76A; WBS 698671
Financial Sponsor: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA United States
Organization Source: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA United States
Description: 1p; In English; Original contains color illustrations
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution under U.S. Government purpose rights; under NASA grant NNX09AG76A and contracts NNA10DF26C, NNA08CG83C, NNA13AC87C
NASA Terms: STATIONKEEPING; SATELLITE DESIGN; LASER PROPULSION; LOW EARTH ORBITS; PROPULSION SYSTEM CONFIGURATIONS; DEGRADATION; PROPULSION SYSTEM PERFORMANCE; GROUND STATIONS; MISSION PLANNING; SOLAR SAILS; DRAG
Other Descriptors: SMALL SATELLITES; LASER; PROPULSION
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