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Record Details

Record 1 of 2365
Navigation of the EPOXI Spacecraft to Comet Hartley 2
External Online Source: hdl:2014/43846
Author and Affiliation:
Bhaskaran, Shyam(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Abrahamson, Matt(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Chesley, Steven(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Chung, Min-Kun(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Halsell, Allen(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Haw, Robert(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Helfrich, Cliff(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Jefferson, David(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Kennedy, Brian(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
McElrath, Tim(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States) Show more authors
Abstract: On November 4, 2010, the EPOXI spacecraft flew by the comet Hartley 2, marking the fourth time that a NASA spacecraft successfully captured high resolution images of a cometary nucleus. EPOXI is the extended mission of the Deep Impact mission, which delivered an impactor on comet Tempel-1 on July 4, 2005. EPOXI officially started in September 2007 and eventually took over 3 years of flight time and had 3 Earth gravity assists to achieve the proper encounter conditions. In the process, the mission was redesigned to accommodate a new comet as the target and changes in the trajectory to achieve better imaging conditions at encounter. Challenges in navigation of the spacecraft included precision targeting of several Earth flybys and the comet encounter, uncertainties in determining the ephemeris of the comet relative to the spacecraft, and the high accuracy trajectory knowledge needed to image the comet during the encounter. This paper presents an overview of the navigation process used for the mission.
Publication Date: Aug 11, 2011
Document ID:
20150006810
(Acquired Apr 28, 2015)
Subject Category: SPACE COMMUNICATIONS, SPACECRAFT COMMUNICATIONS, COMMAND AND TRACKING; ASTRODYNAMICS
Report/Patent Number: AAS 11-486
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: (SEE 20150006774)
Meeting Information: JPL Seminar Day; 11 Aug. 2011; Pasadena, CA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech.; Pasadena, CA, United States
Financial Sponsor: Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech.; Pasadena, CA, United States
Description: 17p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: SPACE NAVIGATION; COMETS; COMET NUCLEI; INFRARED IMAGERY; SWINGBY TECHNIQUE; TRAJECTORY OPTIMIZATION; ORBIT DETERMINATION; SPACECRAFT MANEUVERS; SPACECRAFT TRACKING; DEEP IMPACT MISSION; FLYBY MISSIONS; MISSION PLANNING; INFRARED SPECTROMETERS
Other Descriptors: DEEP IMPACT (DI); DEEP SPACE NAVIGATION; EXTRASOLAR PLANET OBSERVATION AND CHARACTERIZATION (EPOCH)
Availability Source: Other Sources
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