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PHyTIR - A Prototype Thermal Infrared RadiometerThis paper describes the PHyTIR (Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer) instrument, which is the engineering model for the proposed HyspIRI (Hyperspectral Infrared Imager) earth observing instrument. The HyspIRI mission would be comprised of the HyspIRI TIR (Thermal Infrared Imager), and a VSWIR (Visible Short-Wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer). Both instruments would be used to address key science questions related to the earth's carbon cycle, ecosystems, climate, and solid earth properties. Data gathering of volcanic activities, earthquakes, wildfires, water use and availability, urbanization, and land surface compositions and changes, would aid the predictions and evaluations of such events and the impact they create. Even though the proposed technology for the HyspIRI imager is mature, the PHyTIR prototype is needed to advance the technology levels for several of the instrument's key components, and to reduce risks, in particular to validate 1) the higher sensitivity, spatial resolution, and higher throughput required for this focal plane array, 2) the pointing accuracy, 2) the characteristics of several spectral channels, and 4) the use of ambient temperature optics. The PHyTIR telescope consists of the focal plane assembly that is housed within a cold housing located inside a vacuum enclosure; all mounted to a bulkhead, and an optical train that consists of 3 powered mirrors; extending to both sides of the bulkhead. A yoke connects the telescope to a scan mirror. The rotating mirror enables to scan- a large track on the ground. This structure is supported by kinematic mounts, linking the telescope assembly to a base plate that would also become the spacecraft interface for HyspIRI. The focal plane's cooling units are also mounted to the base plate, as is an overall enclosure that has two viewing ports with large exterior baffles, shielding the focal plane from incoming stray light. PHyTIR's electronics is distributed inside and near the vacuum enclosure, and in a nearby rack. The data acquisition technique would be to take measurements over a 51deg wide swath in the cross spacecraft velocity direction, which is brought into view through the rotating scan mirror. A landscape mosaic thus can be assembled by overlaying rows of measurements. The paper briefly outlines the proposed HyspIRI mission and its data acquisition technique; it then describes the prototype PHyTIR instrument.
Document ID
20150008735
Document Type
Conference Paper
External Source(s)
Authors
Jau, Bruno M. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Hook, Simon J. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Johnson, William R. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Foote, Marc C. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Paine, Christopher G. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Pannell, Zack W. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Smythe, Robert F. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Kuan, Gary M. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Jakoboski, Julie K. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Eng, Bjorn T. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
May 21, 2015
Publication Date
March 2, 2013
Subject Category
Instrumentation and Photography
Meeting Information
2013 IEEE Aerospace Conference(Big Sky, MT)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other
Keywords
Space Instrument
Scan Mirror
Telescope