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Nano-Satellite Secondary Spacecraft on Deep Space MissionsNanoSat technology has opened Earth orbit to extremely low-cost science missions through a common interface that provides greater launch accessibility. They have also been used on interplanetary missions, but these missions have used one-off components and architectures so that the return on investment has been limited. A natural question is the role that CubeSat-derived NanoSats could play to increase the science return of deep space missions. We do not consider single instrument nano-satellites as likely to complete entire Discovery-class missions alone,but believe that nano-satellites could augment larger missions to significantly increase science return. The key advantages offered by these mini-spacecrafts over previous planetary probes is the common availability of advanced subsystems that open the door to a large variety of science experiments, including new guidance, navigation and control capabilities. In this paper, multiple NanoSat science applications are investigated, primarily for high risk/high return science areas. We also address the significant challenges and questions that remain as obstacles to the use of nano-satellites in deep space missions. Finally, we provide some thoughts on a development roadmap toward interplanetary usage of NanoSpacecraft.
Document ID
20150008743
Document Type
Conference Paper
External Source(s)
Authors
Klesh, Andrew T. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Castillo-Rogez, Julie C. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
May 26, 2015
Publication Date
May 22, 2012
Subject Category
Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
Spacecraft Design, Testing and Performance
Meeting Information
Global Space Exploration Conference(Washington, DC)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other