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Record Details

Record 6 of 79
Flexible-Path Human Exploration
External Online Source: hdl:2014/45146
Author and Affiliation:
Sherwood, B.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Adler, M.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Alkalai, L.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Burdick, G.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Coulter, D.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Jordan, F.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Naderi, F.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Graham, L.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Landis, R.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States)
Drake, B.(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States) Show more authors
Abstract: In the fourth quarter of 2009 an in-house, multi-center NASA study team briefly examined "Flexible Path" concepts to begin understanding characteristics, content, and roles of potential missions consistent with the strategy proposed by the Augustine Committee. We present an overview of the study findings. Three illustrative human/robotic mission concepts not requiring planet surface operations are described: assembly of very large in-space telescopes in cis-lunar space; exploration of near Earth objects (NEOs); exploration of Mars' moon Phobos. For each, a representative mission is described, technology and science objectives are outlined, and a basic mission operations concept is quantified. A fourth type of mission, using the lunar surface as preparation for Mars, is also described. Each mission's "capability legacy" is summarized. All four illustrative missions could achieve NASA's stated human space exploration objectives and advance human space flight toward Mars surface exploration. Telescope assembly missions would require the fewest new system developments. NEO missions would offer a wide range of deep-space trip times between several months and two years. Phobos exploration would retire several Marsclass risks, leaving another large remainder set (associated with entry, descent, surface operations, and ascent) for retirement by subsequent missions. And extended lunar surface operations would build confidence for Mars surface missions by addressing a complementary set of risks. Six enabling developments (robotic precursors, ISS exploration testbed, heavy-lift launch, deep-space-capable crew capsule, deep-space habitat, and reusable in-space propulsion stage) would apply across multiple program sequence options, and thus could be started even without committing to a specific mission sequence now. Flexible Path appears to be a viable strategy, with meaningful and worthy mission content.
Publication Date: Aug 30, 2010
Document ID:
20150008926
(Acquired May 29, 2015)
Subject Category: LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION; SPACE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: AIAA Space 2010 Conference & Exposition; 30 Aug. - 2 Sep. 2010; Anaheim, CA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Reston, VA, United States
Financial Sponsor: Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech.; Pasadena, CA, United States
Description: 16p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: SPACE EXPLORATION; SPACECREWS; DEEP SPACE; MISSION PLANNING; MARS SURFACE; LUNAR SURFACE; NEAR EARTH OBJECTS; ROBOTICS; SPACECRAFT MODULES; RISK; LAUNCHING; TELESCOPES; HABITATS
Other Descriptors: NEO; TELESCOPE ASSEMBLY; PHOBOS; MARS; AUGUSTINE
Availability Source: Other Sources
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