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Small Habitat Commonality Reduces Cost for Human Mars Missions
NTRS Full-Text: Click to View  [PDF Size: 2.4 MB]
Author and Affiliation:
Griffin, Brand N.(Gray Research, Inc., Huntsville, AL, United States);
Lepsch, Roger(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States);
Martin, John(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States);
Howard, Robert(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States);
Rucker, Michelle(NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States);
Zapata, Edgar(NASA Kennedy Space Center, Cocoa Beach, FL, United States);
McCleskey, Carey(NASA Kennedy Space Center, Cocoa Beach, FL, United States);
Howe, Scott(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States);
Mary, Natalie(Booz-Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Houston, TX, United States);
Nerren, Philip [Inventor](Jacobs Engineering and Science Services and Skills Augmentation Group (ESSSA), Huntsville, AL, United States)
Abstract: Most view the Apollo Program as expensive. It was. But, a human mission to Mars will be orders of magnitude more difficult and costly. Recently, NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) mapped out a step-wise approach for exploring Mars and the Mars-moon system. It is early in the planning process but because approximately 80% of the total life cycle cost is committed during preliminary design, there is an effort to emphasize cost reduction methods up front. Amongst the options, commonality across small habitat elements shows promise for consolidating the high bow-wave costs of Design, Development, Test and Evaluation (DDT&E) while still accommodating each end-item's functionality. In addition to DDT&E, there are other cost and operations benefits to commonality such as reduced logistics, simplified infrastructure integration and with inter-operability, improved safety and simplified training. These benefits are not without a cost. Some habitats are sub-optimized giving up unique attributes for the benefit of the overall architecture and because the first item sets the course for those to follow, rapidly developing technology may be excluded. The small habitats within the EMC include the pressurized crew cabins for the ascent vehicle,
Publication Date: Aug 31, 2015
Document ID:
20150021413
(Acquired Nov 20, 2015)
Subject Category: SPACE SCIENCES (GENERAL); ECONOMICS AND COST ANALYSIS; MAN/SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SUPPORT
Report/Patent Number: M15-4784
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: AIAA Space 2015; 31 Aug. - 2 Sep. 2015; Pasadena, CA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Reston, VA, United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Organization Source: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Description: 19p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution as joint owner in the copyright
NASA Terms: MARS MISSIONS; COST REDUCTION; LIFE CYCLE COSTS; HABITATS; EDUCATION; PRESSURIZED CABINS; SYSTEM EFFECTIVENESS; SAFETY; LOGISTICS; EVALUATION
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