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High Altitude Venus Operational Concept (HAVOC): Proofs of Concept
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Author and Affiliation:
Jones, Christopher A.(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States)
Arney, Dale C.(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States)
Bassett, George Z.(Texas Univ., Austin, TX, United States)
Clark, James R.(Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA, United States)
Hennig, Anthony I.(Rochester Inst. of Tech., Rochester, NY, United States)
Snyder, Jessica C.(Rowan Univ., Glassboro, NJ, United States)
Abstract: The atmosphere of Venus is an exciting destination for both further scientific study and future human exploration. A recent internal NASA study of a High Altitude Venus Operational Concept (HAVOC) led to the development of an evolutionary program for the exploration of Venus, with focus on the mission architecture and vehicle concept for a 30-day crewed mission into Venus's atmosphere at 50 kilometers. Key technical challenges for the mission include performing the aerocapture maneuvers at Venus and Earth, inserting and inflating the airship at Venus during the entry sequence, and protecting the solar panels and structure from the sulfuric acid in the atmosphere. Two proofs of concept were identified that would aid in addressing some of the key technical challenges. To mitigate the threat posed by the sulfuric acid ambient in the atmosphere of Venus, a material was needed that could protect the systems while being lightweight and not inhibiting the performance of the solar panels. The first proof of concept identified candidate materials and evaluated them, finding FEP-Teflon (Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene-Teflon) to maintain 90 percent transmittance to relevant spectra even after 30 days of immersion in concentrated sulfuric acid. The second proof of concept developed and verified a packaging algorithm for the airship envelope to inform the entry, descent, and inflation analysis.
Publication Date: Aug 31, 2015
Document ID:
20160006580
(Acquired May 25, 2016)
Subject Category: LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION; SPACE TRANSPORTATION AND SAFETY
Report/Patent Number: NF1676L-22125
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: AIAA Space and Astronautics Forum and Exposition (AIAA Space 2016); 31 Aug. - 2 Sep. 2015; Pasadena, CA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Reston, VA, United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: WBS 934844.01.03.04
Financial Sponsor: NASA Langley Research Center; Hampton, VA, United States
Description: 12p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution as joint owner in the copyright
NASA Terms: HIGH ALTITUDE; VENUS (PLANET); VENUS ATMOSPHERE; MISSION PLANNING; PROVING; AIRSHIPS; INFLATING; PANELS; SULFURIC ACID; SPECTRAL SENSITIVITY; SCALE MODELS; TRANSMITTANCE; TRANSPARENCE; POLYMERIC FILMS; ETHYLENE; PROPYLENE; TEFLON (TRADEMARK); AEROCAPTURE; ATMOSPHERIC ENTRY; SOLAR CELLS
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