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Testing the Deployment Repeatability of a Precision Deployable Boom Prototype for the Proposed SWOT Karin InstrumentNASA's proposed Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission, scheduled to launch in 2020, would provide critical information about Earth's oceans, ocean circulation, fresh water storage, and river discharge. The mission concept calls for a dual-antenna Ka-band radar interferometer instrument, known as KaRIn, that would map the height of water globally along two 50 km wide swaths. The KaRIn antennas, which would be separated by 10 meters on either side of the spacecraft, would need to be precisely deployable in order to meet demanding pointing requirements. Consequently, an effort was undertaken to design build and prototype a precision deployable Mast for the KaRIn instrument. Each mast was 4.5-m long with a required dilitation stability of 2.5 microns over 3 minutes. It required a minimum first mode of 7 Hz. Deployment repeatability was less than +/- 7 arcsec in all three rotation directions. Overall mass could not exceed 41.5 Kg including any actuators and thermal blanketing. This set of requirements meant the boom had to be three times lighter and two orders of magnitude more precise than the existing state of the art for deployable booms.
Document ID
20160009659
Document Type
Conference Paper
External Source(s)
Authors
Agnes, Gregory S. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Waldman, Jeff (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Hughes, Richard (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Peterson, Lee D. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 1, 2016
Publication Date
January 5, 2015
Subject Category
Earth Resources and Remote Sensing
Meeting Information
AIAA Scitech 2015(Kissimee, FL)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other
Keywords
boom
precision
deployable structure