Record Details

Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo
External Online Source: doi:10.1007/lrr-2016-1
Author and Affiliation:
Abbott, B. P.(California Inst. of Tech., LIGO, Pasadena, CA, United States);
Abbott, R.(California Inst. of Tech., LIGO, Pasadena, CA, United States);
Abbott, T. D.(Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA, United States);
Abernathy, M. R.(California Inst. of Tech., LIGO, Pasadena, CA, United States);
Acernese, F.(Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Italy);
Ackley, K.(Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL, United States);
Adams, C.(LIGO Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA, United States);
Adams, T.(Grenoble-1 Univ., Annecy, France);
Addesso, P.(Sannio Univ., Benevento, Italy);
Adhikari, R. X.(California Inst. of Tech., LIGO, Pasadena, CA, United States);
Camp, J. B.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD United States);
Gehrels, N.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States);
Singer, L. P.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States);
et al.
Abstract: We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. We report our findings for gravitational-wave transients, with particular focus on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron-star systems, which are considered the most promising for multi-messenger astronomy. The ability to localize the sources of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and 90% credible regions can be as large as thousands of square degrees when only two sensitive detectors are operational. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 sq. deg to 20 sq. deg will require at least three detectors of sensitivity within a factor of approximately 2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should the third LIGO detector be relocated to India as expected, a significant fraction of gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.
Publication Date: Feb 08, 2016
Document ID:
20170003272
(Acquired Apr 20, 2017)
Subject Category: ASTROPHYSICS; EARTH RESOURCES AND REMOTE SENSING
Report/Patent Number: LIGO P1200087, GSFC-E-DAA-TN41341, VIR-0288A-12
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Living Reviews (ISSN 2367-3613; e-ISSN 1433-8351); Volume 19; Issue 1
Publisher Information: Springer International Publishing
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD United States
Description: 39p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORIES; BROADBAND; GRAVITATIONAL WAVES; LASER INTERFEROMETRY; MAPPING; NEUTRON STARS; POSITION (LOCATION); REMOTE SENSING; SENSITIVITY; TRIANGULATION; BINARY STARS; INDIA; LIGO (OBSERVATORY); URBAN PLANNING
Other Descriptors: GRAVITATIONAL WAVES GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE DETECTORS ELECTROMAGNETIC; COUNTERPARTS; DATA ANALYSIS
Availability Source: Other Sources
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