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Advanced Exploration Systems Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring
NTRS Full-Text: Click to View  [PDF Size: 26.8 MB]
Author and Affiliation:
Perry, J.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Abney, M.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Conrad, R.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Garber, A.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Howard, D.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Kayatin, M.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Knox, J.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Newton, R.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Parrish, K.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Roman, M.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States);
Toomarian, N.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Abstract: In September 2011, the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project was commissioned by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems program to advance Atmosphere Revitalization Subsystem (ARS) and Environmental Monitoring Subsystem (EMS) technologies for enabling future crewed space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. The ARREM project's period of performance covered U.S. Government fiscal years 2012-2014. The ARREM project critically assessed the International Space Station (ISS) ARS and EMS architectures and process technologies as the foundation for an architecture suitable for deep space exploration vehicles. The project's technical content included technical tasks focused on improving the reliability and life cycle cost of ARS and EMS technologies as well as reducing future flight project developmental risk and design, development, test, and evaluation costs. Targeted technology development and maturation tasks, including key technical trade assessments, were accomplished and integrated ARS architectures were demonstrated. The ARREM project developed, demonstrated, and tested leading process technology candidates and subsystem architectures that met or exceeded key figures of merit, addressed capability gaps, and significantly improved the efficiency, safety, and reliability over the state-of-the-art ISS figures of merit. Promising EMS instruments were developed and functionally demonstrated in a simulated cabin environment. The project's technical approach and results are described and recommendations for continued development are provided.
Publication Date: Sep 01, 2016
Document ID:
20170005175
(Acquired Jun 09, 2017)
Subject Category: MAN/SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SUPPORT
Report/Patent Number: M-1419, NASA/TP-2016-218228
Document Type: Technical Report
Financial Sponsor: NASA; Washington, DC, United States
Organization Source: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Description: 264p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution as joint owner in the copyright
NASA Terms: LONG DURATION SPACE FLIGHT; SPACE EXPLORATION; HABITABILITY; INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION; ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING; LIFE CYCLE COSTS; LESSONS LEARNED; PROJECT MANAGEMENT; LOW EARTH ORBITS; DEEP SPACE; MISSION PLANNING; LOGISTICS; SAFETY; RELIABILITY
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