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In Situ Thermal Imagery of Antarctic Meteorites and Their Stability on the Ice Surface
NTRS Full-Text: Click to View  [PDF Size: 99 KB]
Author and Affiliation:
Harvey, R. P.(Case Western Reserve Univ., Dept. Earth, Environmental and Planetary Science, Cleveland, OH, United States);
Righter, M.(Houston Univ., Dept. Earth and Atmospheric Science, Houston, TX, United States);
Karner, J. M.(Case Western Reserve Univ., Dept. Earth, Environmental and Planetary Science, Cleveland, OH, United States);
Hyneck, B.(Colorado Univ., LASP, Boulder, CO, United States);
Keller, L.(NASA Johnson Space Center, ARES, Houston, TX, United States);
Meshik, A.(Washington Univ., Dept. of Physics, Saint Louis, MO, United States);
Mittlefehldt, D.(NASA Johnson Space Center, ARES, Houston, TX, United States);
Radebaugh, J.(Brigham Young Univ., Dept. of Geological Sciences, Provo, UT, United States);
Rougeux, B.(Case Western Reserve Univ., Dept. Earth, Environmental and Planetary Science, Cleveland, OH, United States);
Schutt, J.(Case Western Reserve Univ., Dept. Earth, Environmental and Planetary Science, Cleveland, OH, United States)
Abstract: The mechanisms behind Antarctic meteorite concentrations remain enigmatic nearly 5 decades after the first recoveries, and much of the research in this direction has been based on anedcotal evidence. While these observations suggest many plausible processes that help explain Antarctic meteorite concentrations, the relative importance of these various processes (which can result in either an increase or decrease of specimens) is a critical component of any more robust model of how these concentrations form. During the 2016-2017 field season of the US Antarctic Search for Meteorites program we aquired in situ thermal imagery of meteorites specimens that provide semi-quantitative assesment of the relative temperature of these specimens and the ice. These provide insight into one hypothesized loss mechanism, the downward thermal tunnelling of meteorites warmed in the sun.
Publication Date: Jul 23, 2017
Document ID:
20170005406
(Acquired Jun 16, 2017)
Subject Category: LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION; INSTRUMENTATION AND PHOTOGRAPHY
Report/Patent Number: JSC-CN-39691
Document Type: Conference Paper
Meeting Information: Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society (METSOC) 2017; 80th; 23-28 Jul. 2017; Santa Fe, NM; United States
Meeting Sponsor: Meteoritical Society; Piscataway, NJ, United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Johnson Space Center; Houston, TX, United States
Description: 1p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Distribution as joint owner in the copyright
NASA Terms: ANTARCTIC REGIONS; ICE; METEORITES; SUN; IN SITU MEASUREMENT; IMAGERY; TEMPERATURE; WEATHERING; MODELS; SINKING; STABILITY; FIELD OF VIEW; SIZE (DIMENSIONS); SOLAR ENERGY ABSORBERS; WIND (METEOROLOGY); DIGITAL CAMERAS
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Last Modified: June 16, 2017
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