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Small Aerostationary Telecommunications Orbiter Concept for Mars in the 2020sCurrent Mars science orbiters carry UHF proximity payloads to provide limited access and data services to landers and rovers on Mars surface. In the era of human spaceflight to Mars, very high rate and reliable relay services will be needed to serve a large number of supporting vehicles, habitats, and orbiters, as well as astronaut EVAs. These will likely be provided by a robust network of orbiting assets in very high orbits, such as areostationary orbits. In the decade leading to that era, telecommunications orbits can be operated at areostationary orbit that can support a significant population of robotic precursor missions and build the network capabilities needed for the human spaceflight era. Telecommunications orbiters of modest size and cost, delivered by Solar Electric Propulsion to areostationary orbit, can provide continuous access at very high data rates to users on the surface and in Mars orbit.In the era of human spaceflight to Mars very high rate andreliable relay services will be needed to serve a largenumber of supporting vehicles, habitats, and orbiters, aswell as astronaut EVAs. These could be provided by arobust network of orbiting assets in very high orbits. In thedecade leading to that era, telecommunications orbiterscould be operated at areostationary orbit that could support asignificant population of robotic precursor missions andbuild the network capabilities needed for the humanspaceflight era. These orbiters could demonstrate thecapabilities and services needed for the future but withoutthe high bandwidth and high reliability requirements neededfor human spaceflight.Telecommunications orbiters of modest size and cost,delivered by Solar Electric Propulsion to areostationaryorbit, could provide continuous access at very high datarates to users on the surface and in Mars orbit. Twoexamples highlighting the wide variety of orbiter deliveryand configuration options were shown that could providehigh-performance service to users.
Document ID
20170007089
Document Type
Conference Paper
External Source(s)
Authors
Lock, Robert E. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Edwards, Charles D., Jr. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Nicholas, Austin (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Woolley, Ryan (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Bell, David J. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
August 1, 2017
Publication Date
March 5, 2016
Subject Category
Space Communications, Spacecraft Communications, Command and Tracking
Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration
Meeting Information
2016 IEEE Aerospace Conference(Big Sky, MT)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other