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Summary of the First High-Altitude, Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test for the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator ProjectNASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator Project is developing and testing the next generation of supersonic aerodynamic decelerators for planetary entry. A key element of that development is the testing of full-scale articles in conditions relevant to their intended use, primarily the tenuous Mars atmosphere. To achieve this testing, the LDSD project developed a test architecture similar to that used by the Viking Project in the early 1970's for the qualification of their supersonic parachute. A large, helium filled scientific balloon is used to hoist a 4.7 m blunt body test vehicle to an altitude of approximately 32 kilometers. The test vehicle is released from the balloon, spun up for gyroscopic stability, and accelerated to over four times the speed of sound and an altitude of 50 kilometers using a large solid rocket motor. Once at those conditions, the vehicle is despun and the test period begins. The first flight of this architecture occurred on June 28th of 2014. Though primarily a shake out flight of the new test system, the flight was also able to achieve an early test of two of the LDSD technologies, a large 6 m diameter Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (SIAD) and a large, 30.5 m nominal diameter supersonic parachute. This paper summarizes this first flight.
Document ID
20170008188
Document Type
Conference Paper
External Source(s)
Authors
Clark, Ian G. (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Adler, Mark (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Manning, Rob (Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech. Pasadena, CA, United States)
Date Acquired
September 1, 2017
Publication Date
March 30, 2015
Subject Category
Aircraft Design, Testing and Performance
Aircraft Propulsion and Power
Meeting Information
AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technology Conference and Seminar(Daytona Beach, FL)
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other