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International Space Station (ISS) Bacterial Filter Elements (BFEs): Filter Efficiency and Pressure Drop Testing of Returned Units
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Author and Affiliation:
Green, Robert D.(NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH United States)
Agui, Juan H.(NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH United States)
Vijayakumar, R.(Aerfil, LLC, Liverpool, NY, United States)
Berger, Gordon M.(Universities Space Research Association, Cleveland, OH, United States)
Perry, Jay L.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL United States)
Abstract: The air quality control equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) and future deep space exploration vehicles provide the vital function of maintaining a clean cabin environment for the crew and the hardware. This becomes a serious challenge in pressurized space compartments since no outside air ventilation is possible, and a larger particulate load is imposed on the filtration system due to lack of sedimentation. The ISS Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system architecture in the U.S. Segment uses a distributed particulate filtration approach consisting of traditional High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters deployed at multiple locations in each U.S. Seg-ment module; these filters are referred to as Bacterial Filter Elements, or BFEs. In our previous work, we presented results of efficiency and pressure drop measurements for a sample set of two returned BFEs with a service life of 2.5 years. In this follow-on work, we present similar efficiency, pressure drop, and leak tests results for a larger sample set of six returned BFEs. The results of this work can aid the ISS Program in managing BFE logistics inventory through the stations planned lifetime as well as provide insight for managing filter element logistics for future exploration missions. These results also can provide meaningful guidance for particulate filter designs under consideration for future deep space exploration missions.
Publication Date: Jul 16, 2017
Document ID:
20170008803
(Acquired Sep 21, 2017)
Subject Category: ENGINEERING (GENERAL); FLUID MECHANICS AND THERMODYNAMICS; MAN/SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SUPPORT
Report/Patent Number: GRC-E-DAA-TN44455
Document Type: Oral/Visual Presentation
Meeting Information: International Conference on Environmental Systems; 47th; 16-20 Jul. 2017; Charleston, SC; United States
Meeting Sponsor: Paragon Space Development Corp.; Tucson, AZ, United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNC13BA10B; WBS 089407.01.22
Financial Sponsor: NASA Glenn Research Center; Cleveland, OH United States
Organization Source: NASA Glenn Research Center; Cleveland, OH United States
Description: 23p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Public use permitted
NASA Terms: INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION; FILTRATION; BACTERIA; AIR PURIFICATION; VENTILATION; DUCTS; VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION; FLOW DISTRIBUTION; K-EPSILON TURBULENCE MODEL; PRESSURE DROP; FLOW MEASUREMENT; MANNED SPACECRAFT
Other Descriptors: FILTRATION; AEROSOL; ISS AIR QUALITY
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