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Changes in Jupiter's Zonal Wind Profile Preceding and During the Juno Mission
External Online Source: doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2017.06.007
Author and Affiliation:
Tollefson, Joshua(California Univ., Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science, Berkeley, CA, United States)
Wong, Michael H.(California Univ., Dept. of Astronomy, Berkeley, CA, United States)
de Pater, Imke(California Univ., Dept. of Earth and Planetary Science , Berkeley, CA, United States)
Simon, Amy A.(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Orton, Glenn S.(Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA, United States)
Rogers, John H.(British Astronomical Association, West Barnham, United Kingdom)
Atreya, Sushil K.(Michigan Univ., Dept. of Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering, Ann Arbor, MI, United States)
Cosentino, Richard G.(New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Physics Dept., Socorro, NM, United States)
Januszewski, William(Space Telescope Science Inst., Baltimore, MD, United States)
Morales-Juberias, Raul(New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Physics Dept., Socorro, NM, United States) Show more authors
Abstract: We present five epochs of WFC3 HST Jupiter observations taken between 2009-2016 and extract global zonal wind profiles for each epoch. Jupiter's zonal wind field is globally stable throughout these years, but significant variations in certain latitude regions persist. We find that the largest uncertainties in the wind field are due to vortices or hot-spots, and show residual maps which identify the strongest vortex flows. The strongest year-to-year variation in the zonal wind profiles is the 24 deg N jet peak. Numerous plume outbreaks have been observed in the Northern Temperate Belt and are associated with decreases in the zonal velocity and brightness. We show that the 24 deg N jet peak velocity and brightness decreased in 2012 and again in late 2016, following outbreaks during these years. Our February 2016 zonal wind profile was the last highly spatially resolved measurement prior to Juno s first science observations. The final 2016 data were taken in conjunction with Juno's perijove 3 pass on 11 December 2016, and show the zonal wind profile following the plume outbreak at 24 deg N in October 2016.
Publication Date: Jun 07, 2017
Document ID:
20170010688
(Acquired Nov 13, 2017)
Subject Category: LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION
Report/Patent Number: GSFC-E-DAA-TN43915
Document Type: Journal Article
Publication Information: Icarus (ISSN 0019-1035; e-ISSN 1090-2643); Volume 296; 163-178
Publisher Information: Elsevier
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NAS5-26555; NNH14CK55B; NNX16AP12H
Financial Sponsor: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Organization Source: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Greenbelt, MD, United States
Description: 16p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright
NASA Terms: BRIGHTNESS; EXTRACTION; JUPITER (PLANET); PLANETARY WAVES; TELESCOPES; VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION; WIND PROFILES; WIND (METEOROLOGY); CLOUD COVER; MICROWAVE RADIOMETERS; STORMS; VARIABILITY; VORTICES; WIND VELOCITY
Other Descriptors: JUNO; JUPITER; ZONAL WIND FIELD; WIND PROFILE; CLOUD
Availability Source: Other Sources
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