NASA Logo, External Link
Facebook icon, External Link to NASA STI page on Facebook Twitter icon, External Link to NASA STI on Twitter YouTube icon, External Link to NASA STI Channel on YouTube RSS icon, External Link to New NASA STI RSS Feed AddThis share icon
 

Record Details

Record 1 of 1
NASA Weather Support 2017
NTRS Full-Text: Click to View  [PDF Size: 312 KB]
Author and Affiliation:
Carroll, Matt(NASA Kennedy Space Center, Cocoa Beach, FL, United States)
Abstract: In the mid to late 1980's, as NASA was studying ways to improve weather forecasting capabilities to reduce excessive weather launch delays and to reduce excessive weather Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) waivers, the Challenger Accident occurred and the AC-67 Mishap occurred.[1] NASA and USAF weather personnel had advance knowledge of extremely high levels of weather hazards that ultimately caused or contributed to both of these accidents. In both cases, key knowledge of the risks posed by violations of weather LCC was not in the possession of final decision makers on the launch teams. In addition to convening the mishap boards for these two lost missions, NASA convened expert meteorological boards focusing on weather support. These meteorological boards recommended the development of a dedicated organization with the highest levels of weather expertise and influence to support all of American spaceflight. NASA immediately established the Weather Support Office (WSO) in the Office of Space Flight (OSF), and in coordination with the United Stated Air Force (USAF), initiated an overhaul of the organization and an improvement in technology used for weather support as recommended. Soon after, the USAF established a senior civilian Launch Weather Officer (LWO) position to provide meteorological support and continuity of weather expertise and knowledge over time. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) was established by NASA, USAF, and the National Weather Service to support initiatives to place new tools and methods into an operational status. At the end of the Shuttle Program, after several weather office reorganizations, the WSO function had been assigned to a weather branch at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This branch was dismantled in steps due to further reorganization, loss of key personnel, and loss of budget line authority. NASA is facing the loss of sufficient expertise and leadership required to provide current levels of weather support. The recommendation proposed herein is to re-establish the WSO under a high level office, with funding set at about the same levels as today, with a revitalized charter and focus to allow for the WSO to operate as originally intended.
Publication Date: Oct 01, 2017
Document ID:
20170011225
(Acquired Dec 05, 2017)
Subject Category: METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY
Report/Patent Number: KSC-E-DAA-TN48273
Document Type: Other
Financial Sponsor: NASA Kennedy Space Center; Cocoa Beach, FL, United States
Organization Source: NASA Kennedy Space Center; Cocoa Beach, FL, United States
Description: 21p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright; Work of the U.S. Government - Public use permitted
NASA Terms: WEATHER FORECASTING; METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES; CHALLENGER (ORBITER); METEOROLOGY; RISK; SPACE FLIGHT; FORECASTING; HAZARDS; LOSSES
Other Descriptors: NASA WEATHER SUPPORT OFFICE; HISTORY; LESSONS LEARNED; LAUNCH COMMIT CRITERI
› Back to Top
Find Similar Records
NASA Logo, External Link
NASA Official: Gerald Steeman
Site Curator: STI Program
Last Modified: December 05, 2017
Contact Us