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Building Better Biosensors for Exploration into Deep-Space, Using Humanized Yeast
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Author and Affiliation:
Liddell, Lauren(Wyle Labs., Inc., Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Santa Maria, Sergio(Wyle Labs., Inc., Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Tieze, Sofia(Blue Marble Space, Seattle, WA, United States)
Bhattacharya, Sharmila(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Abstract: 1.BioSentinel is 1 of 13 secondary payloads hitching a ride beyond Low Earth Orbit on Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), set to launch from NASAs Space Launch System in 2019. EM-1 is our first opportunity to investigate the effects of the deep space environment on a eukaryotic biological system, the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Though separated by a billion years of evolution we share hundreds of genes important for basic cell function, including responses to DNA damage. Thus, yeast is an ideal biosensor for detecting typesextent of damage induced by deep-space radiation.We will fly desiccated cells, then rehydrate to wake them up when the automated payload is ready to initiate the experiment. Rehydration solution contains SC (Synthetic Complete) media and alamarBlue, an indicator for changes in growth and metabolism. Telemetry of LED readings will then allow us to detect how cells respond throughout the mission. The desiccation-rehydration process can be extremely damaging to cells, and can severely diminish our ability to accurately measure and model cellular responses to deep-space radiation. The aim of this study is to develop a better biosensor: yeast strains that are more resistant to desiccation stress. We will over-express known cellular protectants, including hydrophilin Sip18, the protein disaggregase Hsp104, and thioredoxin Trx2, a responder to oxidative stress, then measure cell viability after desiccation to determine which factors improve stress tolerance. Over-expression of SIP18 in wine yeast starter cultures was previously reported to increase viability following desiccation stress by up to 70. Thus, we expect similar improvements in our space-yeast strains. By designing better yeast biosensors we can better prepare for and mitigate the potential dangers of deep-space radiation for future missions.This work is funded by NASAs AES program.
Publication Date: Oct 25, 2017
Document ID:
20170011549
(Acquired Dec 13, 2017)
Subject Category: SPACE SCIENCES (GENERAL); LIFE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Report/Patent Number: ARC-E-DAA-TN48349
Document Type: Oral/Visual Presentation
Meeting Information: American Society for Gravitational and Space Research (ASGSR) Annual Meeting; 33rd; 25-28 Oct. 2017; Seattle, WA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Society for Gravitational and Space Research; Bristow, VA, United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNA14AB82C; NNX15AG98A
Financial Sponsor: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Organization Source: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Description: 8p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Public use permitted
NASA Terms: BIOINSTRUMENTATION; AEROSPACE ENVIRONMENTS; CELLS (BIOLOGY); DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID; YEAST; CYTOLOGY; GENES; LOW EARTH ORBITS; DEEP SPACE; TELEMETRY; TRANSPONDERS
Other Descriptors: YEAST; COSMIC RADIATION; BIOSENSOR
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