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Identification of Novel Desiccation-Tolerant S. cerevisiae Strains for Deep Space Biosensors
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Author and Affiliation:
Tieze, Sofia Massaro(Blue Marble Space, Seattle, WA, United States)
Santa Maria, Sergio R.(Wyle Labs., Inc., Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Liddell, Lauren(Wyle Labs., Inc., Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Bhattacharya, Sharmila(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Abstract: NASA's BioSentinel mission, a secondary payload that will fly on the Space Launch Systems first Exploration Mission (EM-1), utilizes the budding yeast S. cerevisiae to study the biological response to the deep space radiation environment. Yeast samples are desiccated prior to launch to suspend growth and metabolism while the spacecraft travels to its target heliocentric orbit beyond Low Earth Orbit. Each sample is then rehydrated at the desired time points to reactivate the cells. A major risk in this mission is the loss of cell viability that occurs in the recovery period following the desiccation and rehydration process. Cell survival is essential for the detection of the biological response to features in the deep space environment, including ionizing radiation.The aim of this study is to mitigate viable cell loss in future biosensors by identifying mutations and genes that confer tolerance to desiccation stress in rad51, a radiation-sensitive yeast strain. We initiated a screen for desiccation-tolerance after rehydrating cells that were desiccated for three years, and selected various clones exhibiting robust growth. To verify retention of radiation sensitivity in the isolated clonesa crucial feature for a successful biosensorwe exposed them to ionizing radiation. Finally, to elucidate the genetic and molecular bases for observed desiccation-tolerance, we will perform whole-genome sequencing of those rad51 clones that exhibit both robust growth and radiation sensitivity following desiccation. The identification and characterization of desiccation-tolerant strains will allow us to engineer a biological model that will be resilient in face of the challenges of the deep space environment, and will thus ensure the experimental success of future biosensor missions.
Publication Date: Oct 25, 2017
Document ID:
20170011557
(Acquired Dec 15, 2017)
Subject Category: LAUNCH VEHICLES AND LAUNCH OPERATIONS; LIFE SCIENCES (GENERAL)
Report/Patent Number: ARC-E-DAA-TN47991
Document Type: Oral/Visual Presentation
Publication Information: SEE 20170011555
Meeting Information: 33rd Annual meeting of the American Society for Gravitational and Space Research (ASGSR); 25-28 Oct. 2017; Seattle, WA; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Society for Gravitational and Space Research; Bristow, VA, United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNA14AB82C; NNX15AG98A
Financial Sponsor: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Organization Source: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Description: 7p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Public use permitted
NASA Terms: DEEP SPACE; BIOINSTRUMENTATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; EXTRATERRESTRIAL RADIATION; AEROSPACE ENVIRONMENTS; SPACE MISSIONS; SPACE EXPLORATION; YEAST; DRYING; CELLS (BIOLOGY); GENETICS; VIABILITY; LOW EARTH ORBITS; RADIATION EFFECTS; SPACECRAFT LAUNCHING; HYDRATION
Other Descriptors: S. CEREVISIAE; DESICCATION-TOLERANCE; BIOSENSO
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