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Thermal Protection for Mars Sample Return Earth Entry Vehicle: A Grand Challenge for Design Methodology and Reliability Verification
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Author and Affiliation:
Venkatapathy, Ethiraj(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Gage, Peter(Neerim Corp., Mountain View, CA, United States)
Wright, Michael J.(NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, United States)
Abstract: Mars Sample Return is our Grand Challenge for the coming decade. TPS (Thermal Protection System) nominal performance is not the key challenge. The main difficulty for designers is the need to verify unprecedented reliability for the entry system: current guidelines for prevention of backward contamination require that the probability of spores larger than 1 micron diameter escaping into the Earth environment be lower than 1 million for the entire system, and the allocation to TPS would be more stringent than that. For reference, the reliability allocation for Orion TPS is closer to 11000, and the demonstrated reliability for previous human Earth return systems was closer to 1100. Improving reliability by more than 3 orders of magnitude is a grand challenge indeed. The TPS community must embrace the possibility of new architectures that are focused on reliability above thermal performance and mass efficiency. MSR (Mars Sample Return) EEV (Earth Entry Vehicle) will be hit with MMOD (Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris) prior to reentry. A chute-less aero-shell design which allows for self-righting shape was baselined in prior MSR studies, with the assumption that a passive system will maximize EEV robustness. Hence the aero-shell along with the TPS has to take ground impact and not break apart. System verification will require testing to establish ablative performance and thermal failure but also testing of damage from MMOD, and structural performance at ground impact. Mission requirements will demand analysis, testing and verification that are focused on establishing reliability of the design. In this proposed talk, we will focus on the grand challenge of MSR EEV TPS and the need for innovative approaches to address challenges in modeling, testing, manufacturing and verification.
Publication Date: Aug 30, 2017
Document ID:
20170012212
(Acquired Dec 19, 2017)
Subject Category: SPACECRAFT DESIGN, TESTING AND PERFORMANCE; LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION
Report/Patent Number: ARC-E-DAA-TN46348
Document Type: Oral/Visual Presentation
Meeting Information: 9th Ablation Workshop; 30-31 Aug. 2017; Bozeman, MT; United States
Meeting Sponsor: Montana State Univ.; Bozeman, MT, United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNA13AC87C
Financial Sponsor: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Organization Source: NASA Ames Research Center; Moffett Field, CA, United States
Description: 24p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Public use permitted
NASA Terms: THERMAL PROTECTION; MARS SAMPLE RETURN MISSIONS; SPACECRAFT REENTRY; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; DAMAGE ASSESSMENT; STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING; RELIABILITY; FAILURE; MULTISCALE MODELS; MICROMETEOROIDS; SPACE DEBRIS; DESIGN ANALYSIS; HEAT SHIELDING; ABLATION; WOVEN COMPOSITES; PROVING; PLANETARY PROTECTION; PROBABILITY THEORY; TEMPERATURE EFFECTS; MISSION PLANNING
Other Descriptors: MARS SAMPLE RETURN; TPS; DESIGN AND VERIFICATION FOR RELIABILITY
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