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Safe Haven Configurations for Deep Space Transit Habitats
NTRS Full-Text: Click to View  [PDF Size: 229 KB]
Author and Affiliation:
Smitherman, David(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States)
Polsgrove, Tara(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States)
Rowe, Justin(Jacobs Engineering and Science Services and Skills Augmentation Group (ESSSA), Huntsville, AL, United States)
Simon, Matthew(NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, United States)
Abstract: Throughout the human space flight program there have been instances where smoke, fire, and pressure loss have occurred onboard space vehicles, putting crews at risk for loss of mission and loss of life. In every instance the mission has been in Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) with access to multiple volumes that could be used to quickly seal off the damaged module or escape vehicles for a quick return to Earth. For long duration space missions beyond LEO, including Mars transit missions of about 1000 days, the mass penalty for multiple volumes has been a concern as has operating in an environment where a quick return will not be possible. In 2016 a study was done to investigate a variety of dual pressure vessel configurations for habitats that could protect the crew from these hazards. It was found that for a modest increase in total mass it should be possible to provide significant protection for the crew. Several configurations were developed that either had a small safe haven to provide 30-days to recover, or a full duration safe haven using two equal size pressure vessel volumes. The 30-day safe haven was found to be the simplest, yielding the least total mass impact but still with some risk if recovery is not possible during that timeframe. The full duration safe haven was the most massive option but provided the most robust solution. This paper provides information on the various layouts considered in the study and provides a discussion of the findings for implementing a safe haven in future habitat designs.
Publication Date: Sep 12, 2017
Document ID:
20170012311
(Acquired Jan 04, 2018)
Subject Category: MAN/SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY AND LIFE SUPPORT
Report/Patent Number: M17-5955
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: (SEE 20170012304)
Meeting Information: AIAA Space and Astronautics Forum and Exposition; 12-14 Sep. 2017; Orlando, FL; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Reston, VA, United States
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Description: 3p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: Copyright; Public use permitted
NASA Terms: AEROSPACE SAFETY; DEEP SPACE; EVACUATING (TRANSPORTATION); HAZARDS; MANNED SPACE FLIGHT; PRESSURE VESSELS; RISK ASSESSMENT; SPACE HABITATS; ESCAPE CAPSULES; FAILURE ANALYSIS; LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEMS; LONG DURATION SPACE FLIGHT; MANNED MARS MISSIONS; PROTECTION
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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