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NASA's Space Launch System: Systems Engineering Approach for Affordability and Mission Success
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Author and Affiliation:
Hutt, John J.(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States)
Whitehead, Josh(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States)
Hanson, John(NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, United States)
Abstract: NASA is working toward the first launch of a new, unmatched capability for deep space exploration, with launch readiness planned for 2018. The initial Block 1 configuration of the Space Launch System will more than double the mass and volume to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) of any launch vehicle currently in operation - with a path to evolve to the greatest capability ever developed. The program formally began in 2011. The vehicle successfully passed Preliminary Design Review (PDR) in 2013, Key Decision Point C (KDPC) in 2014 and Critical Design Review (CDR) in October 2015 - nearly 40 years since the last CDR of a NASA human-rated rocket. Every major SLS element has completed components of test and flight hardware. Flight software has completed several development cycles. RS-25 hotfire testing at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) has successfully demonstrated the space shuttle-heritage engine can perform to SLS requirements and environments. The five-segment solid rocket booster design has successfully completed two full-size motor firing tests in Utah. Stage and component test facilities at Stennis and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center are nearing completion. Launch and test facilities, as well as transportation and other ground support equipment are largely complete at NASA's Kennedy, Stennis and Marshall field centers. Work is also underway on the more powerful Block 1 B variant with successful completion of the Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) PDR in January 2017. NASA's approach is to develop this heavy lift launch vehicle with limited resources by building on existing subsystem designs and existing hardware where available. The systems engineering and integration (SE&I) of existing and new designs introduces unique challenges and opportunities. The SLS approach was designed with three objectives in mind: 1) Design the vehicle around the capability of existing systems; 2) Reduce work hours for nonhardware/ software activities; 3) Increase the probability of mission success by focusing effort on more critical activities.
Publication Date: Sep 12, 2017
Document ID:
20170012312
(Acquired Jan 04, 2018)
Subject Category: LAUNCH VEHICLES AND LAUNCH OPERATIONS; SPACECRAFT DESIGN, TESTING AND PERFORMANCE; LUNAR AND PLANETARY SCIENCE AND EXPLORATION
Report/Patent Number: M17-5932
Document Type: Conference Paper
Publication Information: (SEE 20170012305)
Meeting Information: Annual AIAA Space and Astronautics Forum and Exposition 2017 (AIAA SPACE 2017); 12-14 Sep. 2017; Orlando, FL; United States
Meeting Sponsor: American Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Reston, VA, United States
Contract/Grant/Task Num: NNM07AA70C
Financial Sponsor: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Huntsville, AL, United States
Description: 3p; In English
Distribution Limits: Unclassified; Publicly available; Unlimited
Rights: No Copyright; Work of the U.S. Government - Public use permitted
NASA Terms: DEEP SPACE; LAUNCH VEHICLES; LOW EARTH ORBITS; SPACE EXPLORATION; SPACECRAFT LAUNCHING; SYSTEMS ENGINEERING; PAYLOAD INTEGRATION; SPACECRAFT PERFORMANCE; SOLID PROPELLANT ROCKET ENGINES; CERTIFICATION; COMPLEX SYSTEMS; COST EFFECTIVENESS; PROVING
Availability Notes: Abstract Only
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