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Ozone Sensitivity to Varying Greenhouse Gases and Ozone-Depleting Substances in CCMI-1 SimulationsOzone fields simulated for the first phase of the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI-1) will be used as forcing data in the 6th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. Here we assess, using reference and sensitivity simulations produced for CCMI-1, the suitability of CCMI-1 model results for this process, investigating the degree of consistency amongst models regarding their responses to variations in individual forcings. We consider the influences of methane, nitrous oxide, a combination of chlorinated or brominated ozone-depleting substances, and a combination of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. We find varying degrees of consistency in the models' responses in ozone to these individual forcings, including some considerable disagreement. In particular, the response of total-column ozone to these forcings is less consistent across the multi-model ensemble than profile comparisons. We analyse how stratospheric age of air, a commonly used diagnostic of stratospheric transport, responds to the forcings. For this diagnostic we find some salient differences in model behaviour, which may explain some of the findings for ozone. The findings imply that the ozone fields derived from CCMI-1 are subject to considerable uncertainties regarding the impacts of these anthropogenic forcings. We offer some thoughts on how to best approach the problem of generating a consensus ozone database from a multi-model ensemble such as CCMI-1.
Document ID
20180002908
Document Type
Reprint (Version printed in journal)
Authors
Morgenstern, Olaf (National Inst. of Water and Atmospheric Research Wellington, New Zealand)
Stone, Kane A. (Melbourne Univ. Victoria, Australia)
Schofield, Robyn (Melbourne Univ. Victoria, Australia)
Akiyoshi, Hideharu (National Inst. of Environmental Studies Tsukuba, Japan)
Yamashita, Yousuke (National Inst. of Environmental Studies Tsukuba, Japan)
Kinnison, Douglas E. (National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, CO, United States)
Garcia, Rolando R. (National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, CO, United States)
Sudo, Kengo (Nagoya Univ. Nagoya, Japan)
Plummer, David A. (Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) Montreal, Quebec, Canada)
Scinocca, John (Victoria Univ. Victoria, British Columbia, Canada)
Oman, Luke D. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Manyin, Michael E. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, MD, United States)
Zeng, Guang (National Inst. of Water and Atmospheric Research Wellington, New Zealand)
Rozanov, Eugene (Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, Switzerland)
Stenke, Andrea (Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science Zurich, Switzerland)
Revell, Laura E. (Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science Zurich, Switzerland)
Pitari, Giovanni (Aquila Univ. Italy)
Mancini, Eva (Aquila Univ. Italy)
Genova, Glauco Di (Aquila Univ. Italy)
Visioni, Daniele (Aquila Univ. Italy)
Dhomse, Sandip S. (Leeds Univ. United Kingdom)
Chipperfield, Martyn P. (Leeds Univ. United Kingdom)
Date Acquired
May 16, 2018
Publication Date
January 29, 2018
Publication Information
Publication: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
Volume: 18
Issue: 2
ISSN: 1680-7316
Subject Category
Geosciences (General)
Report/Patent Number
GSFC-E-DAA-TN55184
Funding Number(s)
CONTRACT_GRANT: NZRSMF 12-NIW-006
CONTRACT_GRANT: CE110001028
CONTRACT_GRANT: CRSII2_147659
CONTRACT_GRANT: ERTDF 2-1303
CONTRACT_GRANT: NNG17HP01C
CONTRACT_GRANT: ERTDF 2-1709
Distribution Limits
Public
Copyright
Other
Keywords
CCMI
chemistry-climate models
ozone layer